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Home > All Images > 2003 > August > 4 Aug 2003

Images Dated 4th August 2003

Choose from 92 pictures in our Images Dated 4th August 2003 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


AN AUSTRALIAN ECHIDNA WALKS ACROSS A TRACK IN SYDNEY Featured 4 Aug 2003 Print

AN AUSTRALIAN ECHIDNA WALKS ACROSS A TRACK IN SYDNEY

An echidna, native to Australia, casts a shadow as it walks over a track in
Sydney's Taronga Zoo August 4, 2003. Scientists say that the echidna, which
has been called a freak of nature, has often been the victim of mistaken
identity with the hedgehog and North American spiny porcupine but is in fact
one of the world's clearest examples of Convergent evolution - the emergence
of chance look-alikes. FOR RELEASE WITH FEATURE
BC-SCIENCE-AUSTRALIA-HEDGEHOGS NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE REUTERS/David Gray
DG/DL - RP4DRIFRLXAA

Compact discs with light interference patterns Featured 4 Aug 2003 Print

Compact discs with light interference patterns

Compact discs. Photograph of several audio compact discs (CD). The CD stores music as a series of fine depressions, representing a digitised musical signal capable of being read by a laser. To reflect the laser light, the music layer is coated with a fine film of metal, normally aluminium, which follows the depressions exactly. The reflective surface is covered by a thick layer of transparent plastic which prevents dust scratches from affecting the sound quality. A standard audio CD can store about 80 minutes of music

© DAMIEN LOVEGROVE/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Bread mould, SEM Featured 4 Aug 2003 Print

Bread mould, SEM

Bread mould. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a sporangium of a bread mould (Rhizopus stolonifer). Spores develop in these sac-like bodies, or sporangia (globular structure). The mould spores then circulate freely in the air, which germinate a network of hyphae (threads) if they land on a favourable medium. Their function is to absorb food for growth and for spore production. Rhizopus sp. produces stolons, or aerial hyphae, which on contact with the medium grow rhizoids (rootlets). These anchor the mould and absorb water. Magnification: x700 at 10x8 inch size

© DR JEREMY BURGESS/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY