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Home > All Images > 2004 > October > 2 Oct 2004

Images Dated 2nd October 2004

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 28 pictures in our Images Dated 2nd October 2004 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Twin Baobab Trees - and termite mound. Known as Boab Tree in Australia where it is the only species Featured 2 Oct 2004 Print

Twin Baobab Trees - and termite mound. Known as Boab Tree in Australia where it is the only species

DH-3363
Twin Baobab Trees - and termite mound. Known as Boab Tree in Australia where it is the only species
Kimberleys, Western Australia during the dry season hence this tree has no leaves.
Adansonia gregori
Named after the explorer A.C. Gregory. All leaves are shed in the dry season. The large white flowers occur in the wet season. They are said to open for one night only and are pollinated by insects such as the hawk-moth. The oval shaped fruits are up to 180mm in length and were used by aborigines for both food and medicine. The aboriginals also used the bark for string and the roots of young trees for food. The bark of young trees was chewed to freshen the mouth.
Don Hadden
Please note that prints are for personal display purposes only and may not be reproduced in any way

© Don Hadden/ardea.com

Twin Baobab Trees - Known as Boab Tree in Australia where it is the only species Featured 2 Oct 2004 Print

Twin Baobab Trees - Known as Boab Tree in Australia where it is the only species

DH-3364
Twin Baobab Trees - Known as Boab Tree in Australia where it is the only species
Kimberleys, Western Australia during the dry season hence this tree has no leaves.
Adansonia gregori
Named after the explorer A.C. Gregory. All leaves are shed in the dry season. The large white flowers occur in the wet season. They are said to open for one night only and are pollinated by insects such as the hawk-moth. The oval shaped fruits are up to 180mm in length and were used by aborigines for both food and medicine. The aboriginals also used the bark for string and the roots of young trees for food. The bark of young trees was chewed to freshen the mouth.
Don Hadden
Please note that prints are for personal display purposes only and may not be reproduced in any way

© Don Hadden/ardea.com