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Home > All Images > 2005 > June > 10 Jun 2005

Images Dated 10th June 2005

Choose from 559 pictures in our Images Dated 10th June 2005 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Benigne de Cirey and Susanna Bathing, left hand panel from the Story of Susanna (tapestry Featured 10 Jun 2005 Print

Benigne de Cirey and Susanna Bathing, left hand panel from the Story of Susanna (tapestry

MMT218747 Benigne de Cirey and Susanna Bathing, left hand panel from the Story of Susanna (tapestry) by French School, (16th century); 260x320 cm; Musee Marmottan Monet, Paris, France; (add.info.: Suzanne au bains entouree de trois servantes;); French, out of copyright

© Bridgeman Images

Bath, Elders, Female, Hiding, Lecherous, Maids, Ogling, Servants, Spying, Textile

Tumour necrosis factor-alpha Featured 10 Jun 2005 Print

Tumour necrosis factor-alpha

Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), computer model. Atoms are represented as spheres and are colour-coded: carbon (grey), hydrogen (white), oxygen (red) and nitrogen (blue). Disulphide bridges are yellow. This protein generally exists as a trimer (a molecule consisting of 3 identical smaller molecules, seen here). It is released by white blood cells, mainly macrophages, during inflammatory immune responses, and acts as a signalling molecule. Its release is triggered by injury or bacterial endotoxins. One of its actions is to kill tumour cells, hence its name. TNF-alpha is also involved in a number of inflammatory illnesses, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and Crohn's disease

© DR MARK J. WINTER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Tumour necrosis factor-alpha Featured 10 Jun 2005 Print

Tumour necrosis factor-alpha

Tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), computer model. This molecule is composed almost entirely of anti-parallel beta-sheets (blue). This protein generally exists as a trimer (a molecule consisting of 3 identical smaller molecules, seen here). It is released by white blood cells, mainly macrophages, during inflammatory immune responses, and acts as a signalling molecule. Its release is triggered by injury or bacterial endotoxins. One of its actions is to kill tumour cells, hence its name. TNF-alpha is also involved in a number of inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis and Crohn's disease

© DR MARK J. WINTER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY