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Home > All Images > 2007 > September > 8 Sep 2007

Images Dated 8th September 2007

Choose from 363 pictures in our Images Dated 8th September 2007 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Coho salmon (OncorhynchusA kisutch) Featured 8 Sep 2007 Image

Coho salmon (OncorhynchusA kisutch)

Coho salmon (OncorhynchusA?kisutch), leaping clear of the water during the summer spawning season. This species lives in the ocean for one to three years before returning to fresh water to spawn. Prince William Sound, Alaska, USA

© Copyright Hiroya Minakuchi / AUSCAPE All rights reserved

Actinopterygii, Active, Agile, Agility, Anadromous, Animal, Aquaculture, Bounding, Brackish, Commercial Fisheries, Commercial Species, Dog Salmon, Energetic, Epipelagic, Fauna, Fish, Food Fish, Freshwater, Full Length, Gamefish, Ieconomically Important, Jump, Keta Salmon, Leap, Marine, North Pacific, Oncorhynchus, Pacific Salmon, Salmon, Salmon Run, Salmonidae, Salmoniformes, Sea Life, Side View, Silver Salmon, Silverbrite Salmon, Table Fish, Wildlife

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), English novelist, 1908-1909 Featured 8 Sep 2007 Image

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), English novelist, 1908-1909

Charlotte Bronte (1816-1855), English novelist, 1908-1909. Bronte was the author of Jane Eyre, Shirley, and Villette. The Bronte family of Haworth in Yorkshire was a literary family; Charlotte's sisters Emily and Anne were also writers, and all died young, before they reached 40. From Penrose's Pictorial Annual 1908-1909, An Illustrated Review of the Graphic Arts, volume 14, edited by William Gamble and published by AW Penrose (London, 1908-1909)

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images

Hongi Maori salutations, 1908-1909.Artist: JL Martin Featured 8 Sep 2007 Image

Hongi Maori salutations, 1908-1909.Artist: JL Martin

Hongi Maori salutations, 1908-1909. A Hongi is a traditional greeting in New Zealand. It is done by pressing one's nose to another person at an encounter. It is still used at traditional meetings among members of the Maori people and on major ceremonies. Through the exchange of this physical greeting, you are no longer considered manuhiri (visitor) but rather tangata whenua, one of the people of the land. For the remainder of your stay you are obliged to share in all the duties and responsibilities of the home people. In earlier times, this may have meant bearing arms in times of war, or tending crops of kumara (sweet potato). When Maori greet one another by pressing noses, the tradition of sharing the breath of life is considered to have come directly from the gods. From Penrose's Pictorial Annual 1908-1909, An Illustrated Review of the Graphic Arts, volume 14, edited by William Gamble and published by AW Penrose (London, 1908-1909)

© The Print Collector / Heritage-Images