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Fortunino Matania Gallery

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Chevalier Fortunino Matania (16 April 1881 – 8 February 1963) was an Italian artist noted for his realistic portrayal of World War I trench warfare.  Amongst the images below are his touching portrayal of a World War 1 soldier saying goodbye to his dying horse (Goodbye Old Man) and The Last General Absolution of the Munsters depicting the regiment on the eve of the Battle of Aubers Ridge in May 1915

Choose from 174 pictures in our Fortunino Matania collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Goodbye Old Man - Soldier and dying horse during WWI Featured Fortunino Matania Print

Goodbye Old Man - Soldier and dying horse during WWI

Goodbye Old Man is a striking image of a soldier bidding farewell to his fatally injured horse. Goodbye Old Man was commissioned by the Blue Cross in 1916 to raise money to help horses on active service.
The artist is Fortunino Matania and it is one of his most famous war-time illustrations. Fortunino Matania (1881 - 1963) was born in Naples.
During and after the war, his work adorned many a history book. During the 1st World War Matania mainly worked for the British magazine The Sphere as their star illustrator, usually producing one full page illustration or more per weekly issue.
He was also employed by the British government and commissioned by individual British regiments. He visited the front several times which allowed him to view wartime conditions at first hand and talk with soldiers about their experiences. From sketches and memory he could then finish a painting, often within a few days

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10046868

Pompeii as it was in Ancient Days by Matania Featured Fortunino Matania Print

Pompeii as it was in Ancient Days by Matania

Life in Pompeii 2000 years ago. A new reconstruction series by Fortunino Matania, no. III. Bringing in the new wine to Pompeii after the October vintage. The opening up of new excavations in Pompeii in 1924 led the Sphere special artist and expert in historical reconstruction, paint a series of scenes of daily life in ancient Pompeii. A new vintage of wine is brought into Pompeii from the countryside by means of specially constructed cars, each containing a skin of wine. The latter was the skin of a cow, with the neck tied up at the front and the tail serving as the only outlet. The car was pulled by two horses along the streets of the town, passing exactly over a causeway of raised stones such as were to be found in every Pompeiian street. Not possessing drains, during rainy weather, the streets of Pompeii were flooded by rain water flowing down to the Tiber, consequently passers-by were forced to cross the street on the raised causeway. The wine car stopped before various taverns, and all the 'anfore' were brought out to be filled. The drawing represents the filling of these anfore. The car was drawn from a fresco discovered at Pompeii. At the time of this drawing by Matania (who had been born in Naples), the same scenes were enacted before the cantine of Naples, which have been built on the same lines as those of Pompeii. Cars loaded with barrels still unloaded the new wine coming from the same vineyards. Date: 1924

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Procession of fancy dress costumes at the Epilogue Ball Featured Fortunino Matania Print

Procession of fancy dress costumes at the Epilogue Ball

The culminating point of the great advertising convention, the Epilogue Ball, marking the close of the first International Advertising Convention held in Britain, which took place at Olympia in the summer of 1924. Just after midnight, a grand procession took place, 'in which groups of daintily-dressed women participated.' Here, Fortunino Matania, the Sphere magazine's special artist, has chosen to focus on the representatives of The Sphere (naturally), who parade along each holding a letter aloft wearing spherical costumes designed by the well-known firm of theatrical costume designers, W. Clarkson. Preceding them is The Tatler (winners of the first prize) and following are representatives of The Sketch. A great illustration depicting the power and influence of illustrated weekly magazines at this time. See picture number 11090454 for photographs of these groups. Date: 1924

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans