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Chamomilla Collection

Chamomilla, also known as chamomile or camomile, is a flowering plant scientifically called Matricaria chamomilla

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla, and stinking

Chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla, and stinking chamomile, Anthemis cotula. Handcoloured woodblock engraving of a botanical illustration from Adam Lonicers Krauterbuch, or Herbal, Frankfurt, 1557

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Marigold, Calendula officinalis, and true

Marigold, Calendula officinalis, and true chamomile, Chamomilla vera? Handcoloured woodblock engraving of a botanical illustration from Adam Lonicers Krauterbuch, or Herbal, Frankfurt, 1557

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Chamomile or camomile, Matricaria chamomilla

Chamomile or camomile, Matricaria chamomilla. Chromolithograph after a botanical illustration by Walther Muller from Hermann Adolph Koehlers Medicinal Plants, edited by Gustav Pabst, Koehler

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla

Chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla. Handcoloured illustration drawn and lithographed by Henry Sowerby from Edward Hamiltons Flora Homeopathica, Bailliere, London, 1852

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Wild chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla

Wild chamomile, Matricaria chamomilla. Handcoloured lithograph by Hanhart after a botanical illustration by David Blair from Robert Bentley and Henry Trimens Medicinal Plants, London, 1880

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Curtis British Entomology Plate 78

Curtis British Entomology Plate 78
Diptera: Tabanus alpinus = Atylotus fulvus Meigen (Alpine Breeze-fly or Clegg) [Plant: Matricaria recutita (Matricaria chamomilla, Chamomile Feverfew)] Date: 1824-39

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Composite Plants (colour litho)

Composite Plants (colour litho)
6004529 Composite Plants (colour litho) by English School, (19th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Composite Plants)

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Matricaria Chamomilla

Matricaria Chamomilla
This genus has been revised since this plate was drawn, and it is probably the same as MATRICARA RECUTITA, or CHAMOMILE

Background imageChamomilla Collection: Rayless mayweed or pineapple weed, Chamomilla suaveolens, flowering weed in agricultural fallow

Rayless mayweed or pineapple weed, Chamomilla suaveolens, flowering weed in agricultural fallow ground


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Chamomilla, also known as chamomile or camomile, is a flowering plant scientifically called Matricaria chamomilla. It belongs to the composite plants family and is widely recognized for its calming properties. With its delicate white petals and yellow center, chamomilla resembles marigold (Calendula officinalis), but it has a distinct scent that some describe as stinking. Curtis British Entomology Plate 78 showcases the beauty of this botanical wonder in all its glory. The color litho captures the intricate details of chamomilla's blooms, making it an exquisite addition to any collection. In ancient times, chamomile was highly regarded for its medicinal benefits. Its soothing aroma and gentle nature made it a popular choice for herbal remedies and teas. Today, many still turn to chamomile tea to relax and unwind after a long day. Wild chamomile can be found growing in agricultural fallow ground under the name Matricaria Chamomilla or Rayless mayweed. Despite lacking ray flowers like other varieties of chamomile, this species still possesses remarkable qualities that make it stand out. Another variation is scented mayweed (Matricaria recutita), which thrives at the edge of oilseed rape crops in Bacton, Suffolk, England during June. Its vibrant blossoms create a striking contrast against the backdrop of golden fields. Whether you appreciate its therapeutic properties or simply admire its beauty in nature's tapestry, there's no denying that chamomilla holds a special place among botany enthusiasts worldwide. This antique engraving illustration serves as a timeless reminder of our fascination with this enchanting plant.