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Geological Collection

"Unveiling Earth's Ancient Secrets: A Journey through Geological Wonders" Embark on a captivating journey through time as we explore the fascinating world of geology

Background imageGeological Collection: William Smith Geological Map

William Smith Geological Map

Background imageGeological Collection: Seven Sisters Chalk Cliffs, and coastguard cottages, Cuckmere Haven, near Seaford

Seven Sisters Chalk Cliffs, and coastguard cottages, Cuckmere Haven, near Seaford, East Sussex, England

Background imageGeological Collection: Continental drift after 250 million years

Continental drift after 250 million years, showing the supercontinent of Pangea Ultima, which was named for the ancient supercontinent of Pangea

Background imageGeological Collection: Geological Strata 19C

Geological Strata 19C
A schematic representation of geology and palaeontology

Background imageGeological Collection: Malham Cove, Yorkshire Dales

Malham Cove, Yorkshire Dales National Park, England. This curving limestone cliff feature was formed by glacial action. It used to have a waterfall running over it

Background imageGeological Collection: Geological map of Britain and Ireland

Geological map of Britain and Ireland
Fig 9 from Britain Before Man (1978), a Geological Museum publication

Background imageGeological Collection: Jenny Lake in front of the Teton range in the Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming

Jenny Lake in front of the Teton range in the Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, United States of America, North America

Background imageGeological Collection: Krakatoa sunsets, 1883 artworks

Krakatoa sunsets, 1883 artworks
Krakatoa sunsets. Artwork of the spectacular red and orange sunsets caused in London, England, by the August 1883 eruption of Krakatoa, a volcano thousands of kilometres away in Indonesia

Background imageGeological Collection: Apollo 17 astronaut

Apollo 17 astronaut. US astronaut and geologist Dr Harrison Schmitt exploring the Taurus-Littrow region of the Moon, as part of NASAs Apollo 17 mission

Background imageGeological Collection: Earths tectonic plates

Earths tectonic plates. Global map showing the boundaries of the tectonic plates that make up the Earths crust. The eight major plates are the: African Plate, Antarctic Plate, Indian Plate

Background imageGeological Collection: Barga, Italy

Barga, Italy
Barga. View from the mediaeval Tuscan town of Barga across the Serchio river valley, towards the summit of Pania Secca (1171 metres) in the Apuan Alps, Italy

Background imageGeological Collection: Tenerife, satellite image

Tenerife, satellite image. Satellite image of Tenerife showing Mount Teide (lower centre). Vegetation is green, and water is blue

Background imageGeological Collection: Geological map of the British Islands

Geological map of the British Islands. 1941

Background imageGeological Collection: Copper and magnesium sulphate, LM

Copper and magnesium sulphate, LM
Copper and magnesium sulphate crystals. Polarised light micrograph (LM) of copper sulphate (CuSO4) and magnesium sulphate (MgSO4) crystals

Background imageGeological Collection: Northern Corries at dawn

Northern Corries at dawn. View looking west just before sunrise across Coire an t-Sneachda (hollow area) to Coire Lochain. The ridge separating the two hollows is is the Fiacaill Ridge

Background imageGeological Collection: The Jurassic Coast of Lyme Regis, Dorset

The Jurassic Coast of Lyme Regis, Dorset

Background imageGeological Collection: Soil triangle diagram

Soil triangle diagram. This diagram is used to work out the type of soil in an area. A sample of soil is left to settle in water. Larger particles settle out of suspension faster than smaller ones

Background imageGeological Collection: Virgils Tomb

Virgils Tomb (1785). Wright, Joseph of Derby 1734-1797. Wright travelled in Italy from 1774-76 and produced many fine drawings of classical subjects and geological curiosities

Background imageGeological Collection: First geological map of Britain, 1815 C016 / 5683

First geological map of Britain, 1815 C016 / 5683
First geological map of Britain, detail of the north east coast (figure 8). This map was published in 1815 by British geologist William Smith (1769-1839)

Background imageGeological Collection: Continental drift maps

Continental drift maps
Reconstruction of the map of the world for three periods according to the Displacement Theory. Figs 1-2 from The Origin of Continents and Oceans (1924) by Alfred Wegener

Background imageGeological Collection: Geological unconformity on the river Jed

Geological unconformity on the river Jed. Plate 3 from Theory of the Earth (1795) Vol. 1, by James Hutton

Background imageGeological Collection: Aquamarine crystal

Aquamarine crystal. Aquamarine is a transparent blue or blue-green variety of beryl (beryllium aluminium silicate). The colour is due to trace amounts of iron within the crystal structure

Background imageGeological Collection: Cornish tin mines, 19th century

Cornish tin mines, 19th century
Cornish tin mines, 19th-century artwork. These mines are in the parish of St Just in Penwith, Cornwall, UK. 19th-century tin mines in this area date back to 1721

Background imageGeological Collection: Continental drift, 100 million years ago

Continental drift, 100 million years ago. Map of the Earth showing the continents some 100 million years after the start of the break-up of the ancient supercontinent of Pangea

Background imageGeological Collection: New Tredegar Colliery, Rhymney Valley, South Wales

New Tredegar Colliery, Rhymney Valley, South Wales
An engine house damaged by subsidence at New Tredegar Colliery, Rhymney Valley, South Wales. This colliery suffered from many landslips and other geological problems, and eventually closed in 1930

Background imageGeological Collection: Trilobite fossil

Trilobite fossil. Fossil of a trilobite (Aristoharpes sp.) from the Devonian period (around 370 million years ago), showing the species characteristic, spade-like shape

Background imageGeological Collection: Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico

Cave of Crystals, Naica Mine, Mexico
^BCave of Crystals.^b Geologist in the Cave of Crystals (^ICueva de los Cristales^i) in Naica Mine, Chihuahua, Mexico. The crystals are the largest known in the world

Background imageGeological Collection: The Giants Causeway rises out of the Atlantic late at night as the last light of

The Giants Causeway rises out of the Atlantic late at night as the last light of the sun disappears below the horizon, County Antrim, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, Europe

Background imageGeological Collection: Seven Sisters Chalk Cliffs, Birling Gap, East Sussex, England, United Kingdom

Seven Sisters Chalk Cliffs, Birling Gap, East Sussex, England, United Kingdom
Seven Sisters Chalk Cliffs, Birling Gap, East Sussex, England

Background imageGeological Collection: The Giants Causeway, UNESCO World Heritage Site, County Antrim, Ulster, Northern Ireland

The Giants Causeway, UNESCO World Heritage Site, County Antrim, Ulster, Northern Ireland, United Kingdom, Europe

Background imageGeological Collection: Green Bridge of Wales, Pembrokeshire Coast, Wales, United Kingdom, Europe

Green Bridge of Wales, Pembrokeshire Coast, Wales, United Kingdom, Europe

Background imageGeological Collection: South ridge of Tryfan from Glyder Fach, Snowdonia National Park, Gwynedd, Wales, United Kingdom

South ridge of Tryfan from Glyder Fach, Snowdonia National Park, Gwynedd, Wales, United Kingdom, Europe

Background imageGeological Collection: Geological Map of Oxfordshire

Geological Map of Oxfordshire
Delineation of Strata of Oxfordshire by William Smith

Background imageGeological Collection: Birthstone Series: Amythest Quartz

Birthstone Series: Amythest Quartz
An Amythest quartz specimen. Amythest is a form of quartz that is usually purple in colour, it is the birthstone for the month of March. Natural History Museum specimen number 84817

Background imageGeological Collection: Continental Drift

Continental Drift
The world 200 million years ago in Upper Triassic times, showing the single continent of Pangaea and the universal ocean, Panthalassa

Background imageGeological Collection: William Smiths geological map

William Smiths geological map
Part of William Smiths geological map of Great Britain, published in 1815

Background imageGeological Collection: Coal forest diorama

Coal forest diorama
A diorama of a Carboniferous coal forest (354 to 290 million years ago) previously on display at the former Geological Museum which is now part of the Natural History Museum, London

Background imageGeological Collection: Standing stones

Standing stones. This is Castlerigg Stone Circle, Cumbria, England. It is on the level top of a hill in the Lake District

Background imageGeological Collection: Mars Exploration Rover

Mars Exploration Rover on the surface of Mars, artwork. The first of two identical NASA rovers, Spirit, landed on Mars on 4 January 2004

Background imageGeological Collection: Ammonite

Ammonite fossil. Ammonites are extinct marine invertebrates. They first appeared in the Late Silurian to Early Devonian period (around 400 million years ago)

Background imageGeological Collection: Barbados, satellite image

Barbados, satellite image
Barbados. Landsat image of the island of Barbados in the Caribbean sea. North is at top. Barbados has a total land area of about 430 square kilometres

Background imageGeological Collection: Polarised LM of a thin section of gabbro rock

Polarised LM of a thin section of gabbro rock
Gabbro. Polarised light micrograph of a thin section of gabbro, an igneous rock. Gabbro is coarse-grained, containing the minerals olivine and plagioclase feldspar

Background imageGeological Collection: Geological map, South-East England, 1830s

Geological map, South-East England, 1830s. This map, dating from between 1830 and 1833, shows the denudation of The Weald

Background imageGeological Collection: Oil well, 19th century

Oil well, 19th century
Oil well. Crude oil erupting from a wellhead in a 19th-century oil field. The wellhead is the structure used to contain and pump oil as it reaches the surface from deep underground, often, as here

Background imageGeological Collection: Venus radar map, North Pole

Venus radar map, North Pole
Venus radar map, centred on the Venusian North Pole. The map is colour-coded for altitude, going from low altitude (purple) through blue, green, yellow and orange to high altitude (red)

Background imageGeological Collection: Bedruthan Steps, Newquay, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Bedruthan Steps, Newquay, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Background imageGeological Collection: Continental drift diagrams

Continental drift diagrams
A) The continents 175 million years ago. B) The continents 50 million years ago. Figs 65 & 67 from The Age of the Earth. See also < a href= http://piclib.nhm.ac.uk/results.asp

Background imageGeological Collection: Bedruthan Steps, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe

Bedruthan Steps, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom, Europe



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"Unveiling Earth's Ancient Secrets: A Journey through Geological Wonders" Embark on a captivating journey through time as we explore the fascinating world of geology. From William Smith's groundbreaking geological map to the awe-inspiring phenomenon of continental drift after 250 million years, every step reveals nature's hidden treasures. Marvel at the majestic Malham Cove in Yorkshire Dales, where towering limestone cliffs stand as a testament to millions of years processes. The intricate details captured in the geological map of Britain and Ireland showcase the diverse landscapes that have shaped our islands over centuries. Delve into history with a glimpse into 19th-century geological strata, unraveling layers upon layers of ancient stories etched within rocks. Jenny Lake stands serenely before the magnificent Teton range in Grand Teton National Park, reminding us how geology intertwines with breathtaking natural beauty across North America. Witness mankind's exploration beyond Earth as Apollo 17 astronauts ventured into space, capturing mesmerizing images that unveiled celestial bodies' geological wonders. Barga in Italy and Tenerife seen from satellite imagery offer glimpses into unique geological formations that leave us marveling at Mother Nature's artistry. Transport yourself back to 1883 when Krakatoa erupted, painting vibrant sunsets across skies worldwide - immortalized by artists who sought to capture this extraordinary display inspired by volcanic activity. The comprehensive British Islands' geological map unravels secrets buried deep beneath our feet while shedding light on their mineral wealth like copper and magnesium sulphate. Join us on this incredible expedition through time and space as we uncover Earth’s most remarkable geological phenomena – an adventure you won't want to miss.