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Microbe Collection

"Unveiling the Invisible: Exploring the Microbial World" In a realm unseen by the naked eye, lies a fascinating universe teeming with life

Background imageMicrobe Collection: HeLa cells, light micrograph C017 / 8299

HeLa cells, light micrograph C017 / 8299
HeLa cells, multiphoton fluorescence micrograph (MFM). The cell nuclei, which contain the cells genetic information, are purple. Microtubules are blue and actin microfilaments are red

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Neutrophil engulfing MRSA, SEM C018 / 8596

Neutrophil engulfing MRSA, SEM C018 / 8596
Neutrophil engulfing MRSA. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of a neutrophil white blood cell (green) engulfing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteria (MRSA, pink)

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Anthrax cultures, historical diagram

Anthrax cultures, historical diagram
Anthrax cultures. 1876 diagram of Bacillus anthracis (Anthrax) bacteria cultured by Robert Koch. Along with Louis Pasteur, Koch is considered the founder of modern medical bacteriology

Background imageMicrobe Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria. These bacteria are a normal part of the intestinal flora in humans and other animals

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria can cause food poisoning when eaten in contaminated food

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria

Coloured TEM of Yersinia pestis bacteria
False colour transmission electron micrograph (SEM) of Yersinia pestis, a species of Gram negative, non- motile, capsulated

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Candida fungus, SEM

Candida fungus, SEM
Candida fungus. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of budding threads (hyphae) of a Candida fungus. The budding areas are where asexual reproduction is producing new fungus cells

Background imageMicrobe Collection: HeLa cells, light micrograph C017 / 8298

HeLa cells, light micrograph C017 / 8298
HeLa cells, multiphoton fluorescence micrograph (MFM). The cell nuclei, which contain the cells genetic information, are blue. Golgi bodies, which modify and package proteins, are orange

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Norovirus particles, TEM

Norovirus particles, TEM
Norovirus particles. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of norovirus particles. Norovirus is a genus of RNA (ribonucleic acid)

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Tuberculosis bacteria

Tuberculosis bacteria. Computer artwork of Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacteria. These Gram- positive rod-shaped bacteria cause the disease tuberculosis

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Spiral spore chain of Streptomyces bacteria

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium

Coloured TEM of a Salmonella bacterium
Salmonella sp. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a Salmonella sp. bacterium. The cell is rod-shaped with long hair-like flagellae

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Flagellate bacteria

Flagellate bacteria. Computer artwork of a rod- shaped bacteria with polar flagella. Bacteria with a morphology similar to this include Helicobacter pylori and Salmonella sp

Background imageMicrobe Collection: E. coli bacterium

E. coli bacterium
Escherichia coli. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium. E. coli are Gram-negative bacilli (rod-shaped) bacteria

Background imageMicrobe Collection: E. coli bacteria

E. coli bacteria
False-colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal inhabitant of the human intestine

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Staphylococcus aureus bacteria
Staphylococcus aureus. Coloured Scanning Electron Micrograph (SEM) of Staphylococcus aureus bacteria. These Gram-positive bacteria cause skin infections

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Yoghurt bacteria

Yoghurt bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of the bacteria Streptococcus thermophilus (spherical) and Lactobacillus bulgar- icus (rod-shaped) in live yoghurt. S

Background imageMicrobe Collection: E. coli bacteria, SEM

E. coli bacteria, SEM
E. coli bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli bacteria (purple) taken from the small intestine of a child. E

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Salmonella bacteria, SEM

Salmonella bacteria, SEM
Salmonella bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). Each rod-shaped structure is an individual bacterium. These bacteria occur mainly in human and animal intestines

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicrobe Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium, coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM). E. coli are Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that are part of the normal flora of the human gut

Background imageMicrobe Collection: MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria

MRSA resistant Staphylococcus bacteria
MRSA: resistant Staphylococcus bacteria. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of a deadly cluster of MRSA Staphylococcus aureus bacteria

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Microscopic view of human respiratory syncytial virus

Microscopic view of human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). RSV causes respiratory tract infection of the lungs and breathing passages

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949

Infections spread by sneezing, artwork C013 / 5949
Infections spread by sneezing. Computer artwork showing virus particles (virions, blue) and bacteria (rod-shaped) in the spray produced by someone when they sneeze

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Illustration of response to infection after vaccination, involving microbe, antigens, antibody, plas

Illustration of response to infection after vaccination, involving microbe, antigens, antibody, plas

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Microscopic view of chlamydia

Microscopic view of chlamydia. Chlamydia is a common sexually transmitted disease (STD) caused by a bacterium

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Flu virus particle, artwork F008 / 3245

Flu virus particle, artwork F008 / 3245
Flu virus particle, computer artwork. In the virus envelope are two types of protein spike, haemagglutinin (H, pink) and neuraminidase (N, orange), which determine the strain of virus

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818

Salmonella bacteria, artwork C013 / 8818
Salmonella bacteria, computer artwork. Salmonella sp. bacteria are gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria that have flagella (hair-like structures) that they use for locomotion

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Microbiology caricature, 19th century

Microbiology caricature, 19th century
Microbiology caricature. The researcher is handling jars labelled as bacterial cultures, while the magnified view at left shows a caricatured appearance of microbes as seen under a microscope

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Influenza virus particles, TEM

Influenza virus particles, TEM
Influenza virus particles, coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM). This virus is the cause of the respiratory disease influenza (flu) in humans and other animals

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Hepatitis C viruses, TEM

Hepatitis C viruses, TEM
Hepatitis C viruses. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of hepatitis C virus particles (green) infecting cultured liver cells (purple)

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM

Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, SEM
Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water, and as normal flora in the human intestine

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM

Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, SEM
Mycobacterium chelonae bacteria, coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM). These Gram-positive rod-shaped bacteria are found in soil and water

Background imageMicrobe Collection: E. coli bacterium, TEM

E. coli bacterium, TEM
E. coli bacterium. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of an Escherichia coli bacterium in the early stages of binary fission, the process by which the bacterium divides

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Cyanobacteria, SEM

Cyanobacteria, SEM
Cyanobacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of cyanobacteria (formally known as blue-green algae, blue). Several spores (pink) are also seen

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Cholera bacteria, artwork

Cholera bacteria, artwork
Cholera bacteria. Artwork of Vibrio cholerae bacteria in the small intestine. These Gram-negative rod-shaped bacteria have a single polar flagellum (tail-like structure)

Background imageMicrobe Collection: E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria

E. coli 0157: H7 bacteria
E. coli 0157:H7 bacteria. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 bacteria, cause of foodborne illness

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Salmonella bacterium dividing, SEM

Salmonella bacterium dividing, SEM
Salmonella bacterium dividing. Coloured scanning electron micrograph (SEM) of of a Salmonella bacterium dividing. The two new daughter cells are seen at upper right and lower left

Background imageMicrobe Collection: False-colour TEM of Salmonella typhi

False-colour TEM of Salmonella typhi

Background imageMicrobe Collection: False-colour TEM of bacterium E. Coli

False-colour TEM of bacterium E. Coli
False colour transmission electron micrograph of the bacterium Escherichia coli, a normal member of human intestinal flora

Background imageMicrobe Collection: E. coli bacterium dividing

E. coli bacterium dividing

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Chains of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

Chains of Streptococcus pyogenes bacteria

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Leeuwenhoek & Microbe

Leeuwenhoek & Microbe
ANTON VAN LEEUWENHOEK Dutch naturalist, depicted discovering the microbe

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Tonsillitis

Tonsillitis. Artwork of the open mouth and throat of a patient with inflamed tonsils. They are flecked with infected yellow patches, due to tonsillitis

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Cartoon depicting Arthur Zimmermann (1864-1940) German politician - Drawing by Adrien Barrere

Cartoon depicting Arthur Zimmermann (1864-1940) German politician - Drawing by Adrien Barrere (1877-1931)
JAB4119018 Cartoon depicting Arthur Zimmermann (1864-1940) German politician - Drawing by Adrien Barrere (1877-1931) from Fantasio, 1930 Private collection by Barrere

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Colony of Haemophilus influenzae, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Haemophilus influenzae, 1906 (litho)
3501914 Colony of Haemophilus influenzae, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)

Background imageMicrobe Collection: Colony of Mycobacterium leprae, 1906 (litho)

Colony of Mycobacterium leprae, 1906 (litho)
3501912 Colony of Mycobacterium leprae, 1906 (litho) by German School, (20th century); Private Collection; (add.info.: Bacteria constitute a large domain of prokaryotic microorganisms)



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"Unveiling the Invisible: Exploring the Microbial World" In a realm unseen by the naked eye, lies a fascinating universe teeming with life. Meet the microbe, an extraordinary entity that encompasses various organisms and shapes our understanding of biology. HeLa cells, immortalized and widely used in research, have revolutionized medical science as they continue to unravel mysteries within our own bodies. Captured under a light microscope (C017 / 8299), their intricate structures reveal secrets waiting to be discovered. Witness the battle between neutrophils and MRSA as these microscopic warriors engage in a relentless struggle for survival. In an astonishing scanning electron microscope image (C018 / 8596), observe how these immune cells engulf harmful bacteria, showcasing nature's defense mechanisms at work. Eagerly multiplying like tiny soldiers on a mission, E. coli bacteria emerge into view through another SEM image. Their presence reminds us of both their beneficial role in digestion and potential harm when found in contaminated food or water sources. Salmonella bacteria take center stage next; their distinctive features magnified by yet another SEM image. These notorious culprits behind foodborne illnesses serve as reminders of proper hygiene practices necessary for safeguarding public health. Behold Yersinia pestis bacteria captured in vibrant colors through transmission electron microscopy (TEM). This captivating visual representation highlights the infamous pathogen responsible for devastating outbreaks such as the Black Death throughout history. Delving deeper into this microbial world reveals Candida fungus thriving amidst its surroundings. A striking SEM image showcases its filamentous structure – reminding us of its ability to cause infections if given favorable conditions. Returning to HeLa cells once more (light micrograph C017 / 8298), we are reminded of Henrietta Lacks' invaluable contribution to medical research - her immortal cell line continues to pave new paths towards scientific breakthroughs even decades after her passing.