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Proteins Collection

Proteins: The Building Blocks of Life From the intricate network of nerve and glial cells to the mesmerizing patterns seen under a light micrograph

Background imageProteins Collection: Nerve and glial cells, light micrograph

Nerve and glial cells, light micrograph
Nerve and glial cells, fluorescence light micrograph. These are neural stem cells that have differentiated into neurons (nerve cells, blue) and glial cells (support cells, red)

Background imageProteins Collection: Anaesthetic inhibiting an ion channel C015 / 6718

Anaesthetic inhibiting an ion channel C015 / 6718
Anaesthetic inhibiting an ion channel. Computer model showing the structure of propofol anaesthetic drug molecules (spheres)

Background imageProteins Collection: Balanced diet

Balanced diet, computer artwork. A balanced diet shown as segments of a pie. The pie shows what proportion of the diet should be made up of each of the major food groups

Background imageProteins Collection: Avian flu virus

Avian flu virus, computer artwork. A virus is a tiny pathogenic particle comprising genetic material enclosed in a protein coat. The coat contains surface proteins (spikes)

Background imageProteins Collection: Secondary structure of proteins, artwork

Secondary structure of proteins, artwork
Secondary structure of proteins, computer artwork. The secondary structure is the shape taken by the strands of proteins, which are biological polymers of amino acids

Background imageProteins Collection: Cell membrane, artwork C013 / 7467

Cell membrane, artwork C013 / 7467
Computer artwork of a cutaway view of the human cell membrane. The cell Membrane is a complex part of the cell that controls what can get in and out of the cell

Background imageProteins Collection: Avian flu virus

Avian flu virus, computer artwork. A virus is a tiny pathogenic particle comprising genetic material enclosed in a protein coat. The coat contains surface proteins (spikes)

Background imageProteins Collection: Nucleosome molecule

Nucleosome molecule, computer model. A nucleosome is a subunit of chromatin, the substance that forms chromosomes. It consists of a short length of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

Background imageProteins Collection: DNA nucleosome, molecular model

DNA nucleosome, molecular model
DNA nucleosome. Molecular model of a nucleosome, the fundamental repeating unit used to package DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) inside cell nuclei

Background imageProteins Collection: Antibodies, artwork

Antibodies, artwork
Computer artwork of antibody molecules showing the structure of an immunoglobulin G (IgG) molecule. This is the most abundant immunoglobulin and is found in all body fluids

Background imageProteins Collection: Bacterial ribosome

Bacterial ribosome. Computer model showing the secondary structure of a 30S (small) ribosomal sub-unit from the bacteria Thermus thermophilus

Background imageProteins Collection: Glutamine synthetase enzyme

Glutamine synthetase enzyme computer model. This is a ligase enzyme, which forms chemical bonds between molecules. The different colours show the different subunits that comprise the protein

Background imageProteins Collection: Blood coagulation cascade, artwork C016 / 9873

Blood coagulation cascade, artwork C016 / 9873
Blood coagulation cascade. Artwork of the biochemical cascade of blood chemicals and proteins during blood clotting (coagulation). The blood vessel and its layered wall is at upper left

Background imageProteins Collection: RNA-editing enzyme, molecular model

RNA-editing enzyme, molecular model
RNA-editing enzyme. Molecular model of a left-handed, RNA double helix (Z-RNA, centre) bound by the Z alpha domain of the human RNA-editing enzyme ADAR1 (double-stranded RNA adenosine deaminase)

Background imageProteins Collection: Zinc fingers bound to a DNA strand

Zinc fingers bound to a DNA strand, molecular model. The double helix of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, red and yellow) is seen here with two Zif268 proteins (blue and green)

Background imageProteins Collection: Influenza virus, computer artwork

Influenza virus, computer artwork
Influenza virus. Computer artwork of an influenza (flu) virus. The virus consists of a core of RNA (ribonucleic acid) genetic material surrounded by a protein coat

Background imageProteins Collection: Fibroblast cell, artwork

Fibroblast cell, artwork
Fibroblast cell. Computer artwork of a fibroblast excreting collagen fibres (tropocollagen). Fibroblasts are cells that produce connective tissue such as collagen (tropocollagen)

Background imageProteins Collection: Interferon molecule

Interferon molecule. Computer model showing the secondary structure of a molecule of interferon. Interferons are proteins produced by white blood cells as part of the immune response to invading

Background imageProteins Collection: Adenovirus, artwork

Adenovirus, artwork
Adenovirus. Computer artwork of an adenovirus, showing the surface structure of the viruss outer protein coat (capsid). Adenoviruses are known to infect humans

Background imageProteins Collection: SARS coronavirus protein

SARS coronavirus protein. Molecular model of the ORF-9b protein produced by the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) coronavirus

Background imageProteins Collection: Polyoma BK virus, artwork C013 / 7465

Polyoma BK virus, artwork C013 / 7465
Computer artwork of the capsid of a polyoma BK virus. This polyomavirus is common in the urinary tract of adults, where it lives without harming its host

Background imageProteins Collection: Cholera toxin, molecular model

Cholera toxin, molecular model
Cholera toxin. Molecular model of the secondary structure of cholera enterotoxin (intestinal toxin). The molecule consists of two subunits, A (top) and B (bottom)

Background imageProteins Collection: Abstract Thin Lines Pattern

Abstract Thin Lines Pattern
Treechild

Background imageProteins Collection: TFAM transcription factor bound to DNA C015 / 7059

TFAM transcription factor bound to DNA C015 / 7059
TFAM transcription factor bound to DNA, molecular model. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM, green) bound to a strand of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, blue and pink)

Background imageProteins Collection: Rhinovirus and antibody, molecular model C015 / 7139

Rhinovirus and antibody, molecular model C015 / 7139
Rhinovirus. Molecular model of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) from a strongly neutralising antibody bound to a human rhinovirus 14 (HRV-14) particle

Background imageProteins Collection: Adenovirus hexon protein

Adenovirus hexon protein, molecular model. Hexon proteins are part of the protein coat or shell (capsid) of adenoviruses. In viruses

Background imageProteins Collection: Close up of a green wheat head with dew drops, East of Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Close up of a green wheat head with dew drops, East of Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Close up of a green wheat head with dew drops; East of Calgary, Alberta, Canada

Background imageProteins Collection: Cell membrane lipid bilayer, artwork F007 / 1477

Cell membrane lipid bilayer, artwork F007 / 1477
Phospholipid bilayer. Computer artwork of the phospholipid bilayer that forms the membrane around all living cells. The cell membrane is made of phospholipid molecules

Background imageProteins Collection: Cell membrane ion channels, artwork C016 / 7689

Cell membrane ion channels, artwork C016 / 7689
Cell membrane ion channels. Computer artwork of a section through the membrane of an animal cell, showing transmembrane ion channel proteins (yellow)

Background imageProteins Collection: Rhinovirus and antibody, molecular model C015 / 7138

Rhinovirus and antibody, molecular model C015 / 7138
Rhinovirus. Molecular model of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) from a strongly neutralising antibody bound to a human rhinovirus 14 (HRV-14) particle

Background imageProteins Collection: MscL ion channel protein structure

MscL ion channel protein structure. Molecular model showing the protein structure of a Mechanosensitive Channel of Large Conductance (MscL) from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium

Background imageProteins Collection: X-ray crystallography C016 / 3824

X-ray crystallography C016 / 3824
X-ray crystallography. Researcher using an X-ray machine to obtain crystal diffraction patterns of proteins for 3-D imaging of enzymes

Background imageProteins Collection: Foot-and-mouth disease virus

Foot-and-mouth disease virus. Computer model of the foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) virus Aphtae epizooticae, showing the symmetrical surface structure of the viruss outer protein coat (capsid)

Background imageProteins Collection: Yeast protein interaction map

Yeast protein interaction map
Yeast protein map showing relationships between proteins in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Each dot represents one of the proteins found in this single-celled fungus

Background imageProteins Collection: Desmosome cell junction, artwork

Desmosome cell junction, artwork
Desmosome cell junction. Computer artwork showing the structure of an adhesion junction, or desmosome. Desmosomes form the most common type of junction between epithelial cells

Background imageProteins Collection: Potato cakes served with grilled bacon on plastic plate, close up

Potato cakes served with grilled bacon on plastic plate, close up

Background imageProteins Collection: Loup au fenouil, raw whole Sea Bass sprinkled with chopped fennel in metal cooking tin, close up

Loup au fenouil, raw whole Sea Bass sprinkled with chopped fennel in metal cooking tin, close up

Background imageProteins Collection: Bag of green lentils tied with a string, close up

Bag of green lentils tied with a string, close up

Background imageProteins Collection: Large selection of dried Peas, Lentils and Beans, close up

Large selection of dried Peas, Lentils and Beans, close up

Background imageProteins Collection: Five sushi parcels on rectangular plate with chopsticks, small sauce bowl, close up

Five sushi parcels on rectangular plate with chopsticks, small sauce bowl, close up

Background imageProteins Collection: Raw lamb chops, close up

Raw lamb chops, close up

Background imageProteins Collection: Scombridae, two raw Mackerels, side view

Scombridae, two raw Mackerels, side view

Background imageProteins Collection: Five raw whole Trouts, close up

Five raw whole Trouts, close up

Background imageProteins Collection: Two raw fish laid on paper wrapper, close up

Two raw fish laid on paper wrapper, close up

Background imageProteins Collection: France, sliced meat, whole raw chicken and packaged saucisson

France, sliced meat, whole raw chicken and packaged saucisson

Background imageProteins Collection: Scattered dried apricots and almonds

Scattered dried apricots and almonds

Background imageProteins Collection: Box of whole dried fish covered with salt, view from above

Box of whole dried fish covered with salt, view from above

Background imageProteins Collection: Triangular smoked salmon and cucumber sandwiches, stacked on skewer over yellow napkin

Triangular smoked salmon and cucumber sandwiches, stacked on skewer over yellow napkin and circular chopping board, glass of water in background, front view



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Proteins: The Building Blocks of Life From the intricate network of nerve and glial cells to the mesmerizing patterns seen under a light micrograph, proteins play an essential role in every aspect of our existence, and are like the conductors of our body's symphony, orchestrating vital processes that keep us alive and functioning. Take, for example, an anaesthetic inhibiting an ion channel C015 / 6718. Proteins act as gatekeepers, controlling what enters or exits our cells. In this case, they regulate the flow of ions necessary for transmitting nerve signals and maintaining proper cell function. But proteins don't just govern our internal workings; they also interact with external threats such as the avian flu virus. These microscopic invaders hijack host cells using their own protein machinery to replicate themselves. Understanding these interactions is crucial in developing effective treatments against viral infections. While some proteins protect us from harm, others contribute to overall well-being through a balanced diet. Our bodies require various types found in different foods to ensure optimal health and nutrition. The secondary structure is truly a work of art—a complex folding pattern that determines their shape and function. Artists have captured this beauty through stunning artwork showcasing these intricate molecular structures. One such structure is the nucleosome molecule—an elegant arrangement where DNA wraps around protein spools called histones—forming compact units within chromosomes. This organization allows efficient storage and retrieval of genetic information during cell division or gene expression. Antibodies are another remarkable class depicted in captivating artwork. These specialized molecules recognize foreign substances like bacteria or viruses and neutralize them by binding tightly to specific targets on their surface—an extraordinary defense mechanism employed by our immune system. Speaking of bacteria, their ribosomes serve as factories producing new proteins based on instructions encoded in DNA—the blueprint for life itself. Understanding bacterial ribosomes has led to groundbreaking discoveries in antibiotic development, combating infectious diseases that threaten human health.