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Steamliner Collection

Step aboard the magnificent steamliner and embark on a journey through time

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Cross-section of Aquitania steamship

Cross-section of Aquitania steamship
Cross-section of the RMS Aquitania Cunard Line ocean liner, designed by Leonard Peskett and built by John Brown & Company in Clydebank, Scotland

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, whistles used for signalling

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, whistles used for signalling
Queen Marys three giant whistles two on the fore funnel and one on the midships funnel, were fitted. Each were seven feet in length, and could be heard five miles away, but so low pitched

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, at Southampton

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, at Southampton
Reaching Southampton the Queen Mary docked in an enormous King George V graving drydock, ready for its maiden voyage to New York in May 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean liner 1936

Queen Mary Ocean liner 1936
Front cover of Weekly Illustrated Magazine showing Queen Mary Ocean liner at Clydebank, Scotland, built by John Brown & Company Scotland. Now permanently moored at Long Beach, California, USA. 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, dining saloon

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, dining saloon
The dining saloon (not to be confused with the restaurant) for Cabin Class passengers on the Queen Mary Date: 1935

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, swimming pool

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, swimming pool
The swimming pool for Cabin Class passengers on the Queen Mary Date: 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Interior on the Queen Mary Ocean Liner, main lounge

Interior on the Queen Mary Ocean Liner, main lounge
Interior of the main lounge, cabin class, (later named the Queens Salon). 90 feet long by 70 feet wide, three decks high, can also be converted into a threatre or cinema room

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, entering dry dock at Southampton

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, entering dry dock at Southampton
Reaching Southampton the Queen Mary entered an enormous King George V graving drydock, at the time of construction in 1933, it was the largest graving dock in the world

Background imageSteamliner Collection: The Queen Mary Cabin Lounge on the ship

The Queen Mary Cabin Lounge on the ship
The Queen Mary cabin lounge on the promenade deck. Date: 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, cabin restaurant

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, cabin restaurant
The restaurant for Cabin Class passengers on the Queen Mary Date: 1935

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, playroom for children

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, playroom for children
The playroom for children of Cabin Class passengers ot the Queen Mary which includes, of course, a model of the ship itself ! Date: 1935

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, manoeuvring down the Clyde

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, manoeuvring down the Clyde
Queen Mary set out on its first voyage, from Clydebank where her interior was fitted out, down the river Clyde to Greenock Scotland

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, passing French liner L Atlantique

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, passing French liner L Atlantique
Queen Mary Ocean Liner, first journey down the river Clyde. Passing on the way lyng off Greenock was the luxurious ocean liner L Atlantique a French vessel, which was caught on fire in January 1933

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, down the river Clyde

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, down the river Clyde
Queen Mary set out on its first voyage, from Clydebank John Browns shipyard where her interior was fitted out, down the river Clyde to Greenock Scotland, escorted by tugs to the sea

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, ready for journey down the Clyde

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, ready for journey down the Clyde
Queen Mary Ocean Liner, at her berth in Clydebank, ready to take her first journey down the river Clyde to Southampton, for her final fitting-out on 24 march 1936. Date: 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Advert for Osram lamps, installed on Queen Mary Ocean Liner

Advert for Osram lamps, installed on Queen Mary Ocean Liner
Advertising that Osram lamps were fitted upon the Queen Mary Ocean Liner. Date: 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, stocking out

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, stocking out
Housekeeping aboard the liner. The huge supply for the Queen Marys stay at port between voyages. To ensure that fresh supplies were always available, triplicate stocks of linen were ordered

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, final preparations for launch

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, final preparations for launch
Final preparations for the launching R.M.S. Queen Mary Ocean Liner then know as Hull Number 534. Hundreds of tons of tallow, soft soap

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, in construction

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, in construction
John Brown & Company in Clydebank in Scotland, begin the major task of constructing Queen Mary Ocean Liner then know as Hull Number 534, which began in December 1930 on the River Clyde

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, journey down the Clyde

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, journey down the Clyde
Map to show how Queen Mary Ocean Liner navigated on its first journey from Clydebank where her interior was fitted out, down the river Clyde to Greenock Scotland, escorted by tugs to the sea

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, suspended

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, suspended
R.M.S. Queen Mary at the John Brown shipyard, December 1931. Work on the ship, then known as Cunard No. 534, had been suspended on 13th December 1931 as Cunard had run out of funds

Background imageSteamliner Collection: R. M. S. Queen Mary, record Atlantic crossing, by G. H. Davi

R. M. S. Queen Mary, record Atlantic crossing, by G. H. Davi
The ever-shortening Atlantic crossing: Epochs in its history; with a scale showing, graphically, the reduction from Columbuss seventy days to the Queen Mary in four days. 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, takes to the sea

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, takes to the sea
With all the difficulties and dangers of her journey down the Clyde behind her, the Queen Mary enters for the firts time open sea which she was built for. 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Interior on the Queen Mary Ocean Liner

Interior on the Queen Mary Ocean Liner
Interior of an private luxurious sitting-room, with comfortable dinning room chairs, wooden panels and soft furnishings. 118 feet long assembly room for cabin class

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, ready for travel to Greenock

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, ready for travel to Greenock
Front cover of Weekly Illustrated magazine, photograph showing the Queen Mary lying in the dock ay Clydebank in Scotland, from which she will have to be manoeuvred across the river into the mouth of

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner to Greenock, Inverclyde

Queen Mary Ocean Liner to Greenock, Inverclyde
Queen Mary set out on its first voyage, from Clydebank where her interior was fitted out, down the river Clyde to Greenock Scotland, escorted by tugs to the sea

Background imageSteamliner Collection: King Edward VIII visits Queen Mary Ocean Liner

King Edward VIII visits Queen Mary Ocean Liner
Shortly before the liner leaves Clydebank in Scotland, for Southampton on her trials. King Edward VIII visits Queen Mary Ocean Liner, for the third time

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, interior fitted for passenger use

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, interior fitted for passenger use
Queen Mary Ocean Liner, in the fitting-out berth at Clydebank in Scotland, which was her home for two years after the launch by Queen Mary in September 1934 to 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, being fitted out

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, being fitted out
With the launching of the Queen Mary Ocean Liner a new phase of work began. Eighteen months between September 1934, and her departure for preliminary trials on 24 March 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, nearly ready for launching

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, nearly ready for launching
The Queen Mary, then known as Hull Number 534, had been halted between 1931 and 1934 due to the Great Depression of the 1930s

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, 6 months of activity

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, 6 months of activity
Six months of ceaseless activity. The Queen Mary, then known as Hull Number 534, had been halted between 1931 and 1934 due to the Great Depression of the 1930s

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, supplying her 1000 needs

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, supplying her 1000 needs
The Queen Mary, then known as Hull Number 534, had been halted between 1931 and 1934 due to the Great Depression of the 1930s

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner, work resumed

Queen Mary Ocean Liner, work resumed
John Brown & Company in Clydebank in Scotland, begin the major task of constructing Queen Mary Ocean Liner then know as Hull Number 534, which began in December 1930 on the River Clyde

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner crisis stops work

Queen Mary Ocean Liner crisis stops work
Tragedy comes to Clydeside. On 10th December 1931, almost exactly a year after signing of the contract for the construction of Hull Number 534, know as Queen Mary Ocean Liner

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner work begins

Queen Mary Ocean Liner work begins
Full Steam Ahead. John Brown & Company in Clydebank in Scotland, begin the major task of constructing Queen Mary Ocean Liner then know as Hull Number 534

Background imageSteamliner Collection: insert

insert Date: 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Detail of Queen Mary ocean liner, by G. H. Davis

Detail of Queen Mary ocean liner, by G. H. Davis
Detail of the equipment of the Queen Mary ocean liner, which contained 40, 000 tons of steel, in the hull plating and bulkheads and 10, 000, 000 rivets. 1936

Background imageSteamliner Collection: Queen Mary Ocean Liner

Queen Mary Ocean Liner
The giant liner The Queen Mary of the Cunard White Star Company, known as Hull Number 534. Date: 1934



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Step aboard the magnificent steamliner and embark on a journey through time. Cross-sections of the Aquitania steamship reveal its intricate design, showcasing the marvels of engineering that propelled it across vast oceans. As we delve deeper into history, we encounter the iconic Queen Mary Ocean Liner, adorned with majestic whistles used for signaling her presence to all who crossed her path in 1936. Standing proudly at Southampton, the Queen Mary exudes elegance and grandeur. Her dining saloon beckons passengers to indulge in exquisite culinary delights while surrounded by opulent decor. The ship's swimming pool offers a refreshing oasis amidst the vastness of the sea, inviting guests to bask in luxury and leisure. Venturing further within this floating palace, we discover the enchanting Cabin Lounge on board The Queen Mary. A sanctuary of comfort and sophistication where travelers can unwind and socialize amidst plush furnishings and breathtaking views. Indulgence knows no bounds as we step into the cabin restaurant where delectable meals are served with impeccable service. Meanwhile, children find joy in their own playroom specially designed to keep them entertained throughout their voyage. Witnessing this colossal vessel maneuver down Clyde River is an awe-inspiring sight - a testament to human ingenuity conquering nature's obstacles. Passing by L'Atlantique, a French liner standing tall beside our mighty steamliner only emphasizes its sheer magnitude. The steamliner experience transcends mere transportation; it encapsulates an era when travel was synonymous with elegance and adventure. So come aboard this time machine that takes us back to an age where ocean liners ruled supreme – where dreams were woven into every inch of these floating palaces.