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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Abandonment Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 47 pictures in our Abandonment collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Sicily - Ancient Quarries at Campobello Featured Print

Sicily - Ancient Quarries at Campobello

Black and white Victorian lantern slide of the ancient quarries at Campobello. Two men sit on the Rocks of Cusa, stone that was once used to construct the Greek Selinunte temple. The layout of the quarry is due to the abrupt abandonment following an unexpected arrival of Carthaginian invader Hannibal Mago in 409 BC.. Slide number 46 of Box 106 entitled Sicily Date: circa 1890s

© The Boswell Collection, Bexley Heritage Trust / Mary Evans

Dido in Despair, published by Hannah Humphrey, 1801 (hand-coloured engraving) Featured Print

Dido in Despair, published by Hannah Humphrey, 1801 (hand-coloured engraving)

XCF407386 Dido in Despair, published by Hannah Humphrey, 1801 (hand-coloured engraving) by Gillray, James (1757-1815); Private Collection; (add.info.: Lady Emma Hamilton (1761-1815) laments the departure of her Aeneas or Lord Horatio Nelson (1758-1805); the album Studies of Academic Attitudes taken from Life'; mention of the old Antique is a satirical reference to her husband, Sir William Hamilton (1730-1803) collector and antiquarian;); English, out of copyright

© Copyright: www.bridgemanart.com

The Engagement at Mati: Greek Artillery Making Good Practice, 1897; it was Generally Featured Print

The Engagement at Mati: Greek Artillery Making Good Practice, 1897; it was Generally

THE ENGAGEMENT AT MATI: GREEK ARTILLERY MAKING GOOD PRACTICE, 1897; It was generally agreed that the Greeks had more than held their own during the final engagement at Mati before the retreat was ordered. The morning had been taken up by a hot duel between the Greek and Turkish batteries, with but small loss to the Greeks. Hitherto the Turkish fire had ceased about midday, but on this occasion there was no interval, and shells came screaming overhead without any intermission. Turkish infantry advanced on the Greek left wing, and were compelled to retire. The Turkish cavalry prepared to charge, but also retired in face of the Greek fire. An attack on the right centre fared no better. When the day was over everything pointed to an interesting fight on the morrow. The subsequent abandonment by the Greeks of their position, which was followed by the disgraceful stampede, is therefore inexplicable

© Quint Lox Limited