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Framed Pictures, Canvas Prints
Posters & Jigsaws since 2004

Radar Gallery

Available as Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 285 pictures in our Radar collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


E-3D Sentry Aircraft Lands at RAF Waddington Featured Print

E-3D Sentry Aircraft Lands at RAF Waddington

An E-3D Sentry aircraft from 8 Squadron, Royal Air Force lands at RAF Waddington, Lincolnshire.
The Sentry's roles include air and sea surveillance, airborne command and control, weapons control and it can also operate as an extensive communications platform.
The RAF operates seven E-3D Sentry aircraft in the airborne surveillance and command-and-control role. The aircraft are based at RAF Waddington, where they are operated by Nos 8 and 23 Squadrons as the UK's contribution to the NATO Airborne Early Warning and Control Force.
The E-3D also forms one arm of the UK Intelligence, Surveillance, Target Acquisition and Reconnaissance (ISTAR) triad of Sentinel R1, E-3D and Nimrod R1 aircraft. Whilst primarily procured as an airborne early warning aircraft, the E- 3D has been extensively employed in the Airborne Warning and Control System (AWACS) role.
The E-3D Sentry, known to the RAF as the AEW1, is based on the commercial Boeing 707-320B aircraft, which has been extensively modified and updated to accommodate modern mission systems. Mission endurance is approximately 11 hours (over 5000nmls), although this can be extended by air - to- air refuelling.
The E-3D is the only aircraft in the RAF's inventory capable of air-to-air refuelling by both the American flying-boom system and the RAF's probe-and-drogue method

Africa, topographic map Featured Print

Africa, topographic map

Africa, topographic map. Highlands and lowlands of the continents are shown as ridges and flat areas. Southern Europe and the Middle East are also seen at top and upper right respectively. The seabed depth varies from shallow (light blue) on the continental shelves, to deep ocean basins (dark blue). Topographic and bathymetric data is usually gathered by using aerial and satellite imagery combined with radar and sonar mapping. The satellites in this case were NOAA's POES satellites

© PLANETARY VISIONS LTD/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Blowing up old radar station, Beachy Head, Sussex Featured Print

Blowing up old radar station, Beachy Head, Sussex

Blowing up an old radar station at Beachy Head, near Eastbourne, Sussex. In 1950 an underground Air Ministry Radio Station was constructed on the cliff top at Beachy Head. It was in fact part of a top secret Early Warning (CEW) system which remained part of Britains defence capabilities until it closed a decade later. One Sunday in late September 1963, members of the demolition team of the 21st SAS Territorial Regiment started to clear the surface buildings. The buildings proved to be stronger than first expected, so the team packed in more explosives and tried again. Demolition had to be abandoned until the next day, when the manager of a nearby hotel complained that his windows had cracked. The task of clearing the remaining buildings was then taken over by a local demolition company. At a later stage the stairwell access behind the guardhouse was demolished and capped, along with the emergency exit, humid air exit and cable shaft. The only way into the bunker was via a small manhole set into the concrete slab placed over the stairwell. Access remained available to the bunker for a while, but due to vandalism the entrance was finally sealed with a large tree trunk thrust into the hole by a JCB and back filled with chalk. Today tourists can stand on the mound above the bunker unaware of the secret rooms and tunnels beneath their feet. Date: 1963

© Mary Evans Picture Library/DAVID LEWIS HODGSON