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Home > All Images > 2003 > October > 9 Oct 2003

Images Dated 9th October 2003

Choose from 103 pictures in our Images Dated 9th October 2003 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Honolua Bay, famous Surfing Beach on North Shore, Maui, HI.Hawaii Featured 9 Oct 2003 Print

Honolua Bay, famous Surfing Beach on North Shore, Maui, HI.Hawaii

© Viola'S Photo Visions Inc. / Animals Animals/Earth Scenes

Aa Photographer, America, Bay, Coast, Coast Line, Environment, Environmental, Franklin Viola, Geology, Hawaii, Hawaiian Archipelago, Hawaiian Islands, Honolua Bay, Landscape, Location, Maui, Natural, Nature, North America, Ocean, Out Side, Outdoor, Outdoors, Pacific Ocean, Scen Ic, Shore, United States, United States Of America, Us A, Violas Photo Visions Inc, Water, Wave

Satellite image of Hurricane Nora over the Pacific Featured 9 Oct 2003 Print

Satellite image of Hurricane Nora over the Pacific

Hurricane Nora. Satellite image of Hurricane Nora off the coast of Baja California, Mexico. The hurricane is the swirl of clouds surrounding the dark hole (the "eye") at lower right. The "eye" is comprised of relatively calm, cloud-free air at a very low pressure. Around this "eye" are very strong winds which blow at over 100 kilometres per hour. Hurricanes form in tropical regions and are caused by large-scale evaporation and convection due to warm sea temperatures. The eastward movement of warm water in the Pacific (known an El Nino event) may cause more hurricanes to form off the American continent's coast. Image taken on 22 September 1997 by the American GOES-9 satellite

© NASA/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

BaBar particle detector, SLAC Featured 9 Oct 2003 Print

BaBar particle detector, SLAC

BaBar particle detector. Wide angle view of engineers working on the open BaBar particle detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC), California, USA. It is hoped that BaBar will help to explain why there is more matter than antimatter in the universe. BaBar will detect the B mesons and their antimatter equivalents, anti-B mesons, that result from the collisions of accelerated electrons and positrons. The collisions will occur at the detector's centre. Different B meson and anti-B meson decay rates would help to explain the greater amount of matter in the universe. When BaBar is in use the large iron doors at far left and right are closed

© DAVID PARKER/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY