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Home > All Images > 2004 > October > 20 Oct 2004

Images Dated 20th October 2004

Available as Framed Photos, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 30 pictures in our Images Dated 20th October 2004 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Photos, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Catands Eye nebula Featured 20 Oct 2004 Print

Catands Eye nebula

Cat's Eye nebula. Hubble Space Telescope image of the Cat's Eye nebula (NGC 6543). This is a planetary nebula, shells of gas cast off by a dying star, whose light illuminates them. The star is seen at the centre of the nebula. The name is misleading, as planetary nebulae have nothing to do with planets. The structure of the gas shells is extremely intricate, and reveals much about the star and its slow death. The central regions show dense knots of gas amongst tangled streamers. The outer parts show concentric shells, cast off in 1500 year pulses. The Cat's Eye nebula lies around 3600 light years from Earth in the constellation Draco

© Nasa/Esa/Stsci/Science Photo Library

Artwork showing inside view of the right ventricle Featured 20 Oct 2004 Print

Artwork showing inside view of the right ventricle

Human heart. Illustration of the inside of the right ventricle of the heart. The heart contains four muscular chambers, 2 atria, and 2 ventricles which pump blood around the body. During a heart- beat blood flows into the ventricles from the atria. The ventricles contract forcing blood into the arteries because of the closure of valves bet- ween the atria & the ventricles. The white fibrous regions seen here are the chordae tendineae which attach the papillary muscles (centre) to the tricuspid valve above. They maintain closure of the tricuspid valve, allowing the right ventricle to pump blood into the pulmonary artery to the lungs, rather than back into the right atrium

© JOHN BAVOSI/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY