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Cathode Collection

In the realm of technological advancements, one cannot overlook the significance of cathode

Background imageCathode Collection: A Calculating machine, 1949

A Calculating machine, 1949
A double page spread from the Illustrated London News, 1949, reporting on the automatic sequence controlled calculating machine at Manchester University

Background imageCathode Collection: Finished electronic valves, Ernest Turner Electrical Instrum

Finished electronic valves, Ernest Turner Electrical Instruments factory, High Wycombe in 1951

Background imageCathode Collection: Ernest Turner Electrical Instruments factory, High Wycombe

Ernest Turner Electrical Instruments factory, High Wycombe in 1951

Background imageCathode Collection: The Grove cell, from Les Merveilles de la Science, pub. 1870

The Grove cell, from Les Merveilles de la Science, pub. 1870
3614216 The Grove cell, from Les Merveilles de la Science, pub.1870. by French School, (19th century); (add.info.: The Grove cell, an early electric primary cell named after its inventor)

Background imageCathode Collection: Zinc factory C017 / 9410

Zinc factory C017 / 9410
Zinc factory. Workers installing the electrolysis cathodes used for zinc plating at a factory. Photographed in Chelyabinsk, Russia

Background imageCathode Collection: Military radar in wartime by G. H. Davis

Military radar in wartime by G. H. Davis
Military radar: how this vital secret weapon helped the Allied land forces to achieve final victory during the Second World War. Date: 1945

Background imageCathode Collection: Use of radar in the war at sea by G. H. Davis

Use of radar in the war at sea by G. H. Davis
Radar in the war at sea: some ways in which the Royal Navy used this weapon during the Second World War. Date: 1945

Background imageCathode Collection: Illustration of copper electrode, as cathode electrons arrive from zinc anode via external circuit

Illustration of copper electrode, as cathode electrons arrive from zinc anode via external circuit, they reduce hydrogen ions from acid, forming hydrogen gas molecules

Background imageCathode Collection: Illustration of copper ion reduced to copper atoms by electrons on battery

Illustration of copper ion reduced to copper atoms by electrons on battery, on surface of brass key cathode

Background imageCathode Collection: PHYSICS: APPARATUS, 1879. A Crookes tube in which a strip of platinum (b) is made

PHYSICS: APPARATUS, 1879. A Crookes tube in which a strip of platinum (b) is made red hot by the passage of current between the bowl-shaped cathode (a) and an anode (D)

Background imageCathode Collection: An apparatus developed by Sir William Crookes (1832-1919). The diagram shows the deflection of

An apparatus developed by Sir William Crookes (1832-1919). The diagram shows the deflection of cathode or Crookes rays
CROOKES: APPARATUS. An apparatus developed by Sir William Crookes (1832-1919). The diagram shows the deflection of cathode or Crookes rays in an ordinary high-vacuum tube by a steel magnet held near

Background imageCathode Collection: Various substances fluorescing in vacuum tubes of different shapes. Chromolithograph, Leipzig 1903

Various substances fluorescing in vacuum tubes of different shapes. Chromolithograph, Leipzig 1903

Background imageCathode Collection: Light-emitting diode

Light-emitting diode (LED), cutaway computer artwork. LEDs contain a semiconductor (red square, centre left) that emits light when a current passes through it

Background imageCathode Collection: 19th Century Crookes Tube

19th Century Crookes Tube. Invented by William Crookes (1832-1919) in the late 19th century this apparatus was used to investigate the path taken by electrons, or cathode rays as they were known

Background imageCathode Collection: 19th Century Crookes Tubes

19th Century Crookes Tubes. Invented by William Crookes (1832-1919) in the late 19th century this apparatus was used to investigate the path taken by electrons, or cathode rays as they were known

Background imageCathode Collection: Steel plates for copper electrorefining C018 / 2349

Steel plates for copper electrorefining C018 / 2349
Copper production. Steel plates being loaded into an electrolytic cell at a refinery. These are cathode plates, steel sheets onto which pure copper is deposited by electrolysis

Background imageCathode Collection: Steel plates for copper electrorefining C018 / 2350

Steel plates for copper electrorefining C018 / 2350
Copper production. Steel plates being loaded into an electrolytic cell at a refinery. These are cathode plates, steel sheets onto which pure copper is deposited by electrolysis

Background imageCathode Collection: Copper plates at a refinery C018 / 2348

Copper plates at a refinery C018 / 2348
Copper production. Stacks of copper plates at a refinery. These are cathode plates, steel sheets onto which pure copper has deposited by electrolysis

Background imageCathode Collection: Coolidge X-ray tube C016 / 3688

Coolidge X-ray tube C016 / 3688
Coolidge tube. This is a device used for creating a beam of X-rays. The glass flask contains a vacuum. A cathode (right) is heated and releases electrons

Background imageCathode Collection: Crookes cathode ray tube, 1880s C016 / 3666

Crookes cathode ray tube, 1880s C016 / 3666
Crookes tube. A Crookes tube, used to create cathode rays, made in the 1880s. This is a tube containing a near vacuum. A high voltage is applied across the two electrodes

Background imageCathode Collection: CROOKES: APPARATUS, 1879. One of William Crookes appliances showing the propulsion of a wheel by

CROOKES: APPARATUS, 1879. One of William Crookes appliances showing the propulsion of a wheel by the impact of the cathode rays when they are deflected by a horseshoe magnet. Line engraving, 1904

Background imageCathode Collection: Electricity from rice plants

Electricity from rice plants. Electrodes placed in a pot of rice seedlings grown underwater. Anaerobic bacteria, such as Geobacter sp

Background imageCathode Collection: Sodium hydroxide production

Sodium hydroxide production. Schematic diagram of the diaphragm cell method for the chlor-alkali electrolytic process to produce sodium hydroxide

Background imageCathode Collection: Aluminium production

Aluminium production
Aluminium smelting process. Schematic diagram of the production of aluminium metal from aluminium ore (bauxite). The first stage (left) is the Bayer Process to produce alumina (aluminium oxide)

Background imageCathode Collection: Copper rod production

Copper rod production
Copper production. A long rod of hot copper being shaped at a refinery. This copper has come from high grade recycled metal

Background imageCathode Collection: Electrolysis of water

Electrolysis of water. Close-up of the top of a Hoffman Voltameter used to decompose molecules of water. A power supply (not seen)

Background imageCathode Collection: A Calculating machine

A Calculating machine
The control panel of the automatic sequence-controlled calculating machine at Manchester University; showing the monitor cathode-ray tube with Dr. T. Kilburn (left) and Professor F. C


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In the realm of technological advancements, one cannot overlook the significance of cathode. Dating back to 1949, this calculating machine revolutionized the way complex computations were carried out. With its intricate design and meticulous craftsmanship, it paved the way for future innovations in computing. But cathode's influence extended beyond just calculations. It played a crucial role in electrolysis of water, a process that split water molecules into hydrogen and oxygen through electrical energy. This breakthrough discovery opened up new possibilities in various industries such as fuel production and chemical synthesis. The mastery behind cathode was showcased in the finished electronic valves at Ernest Turner Electrical Instruments factory located in High Wycombe. The skilled artisans meticulously crafted these valves with precision and expertise, ensuring their flawless performance. Speaking of Ernest Turner Electrical Instruments factory, it served as a hub for innovation and excellence. Nestled amidst picturesque surroundings, this facility became synonymous with cutting-edge technology and groundbreaking inventions. Countless hours were spent here perfecting every detail to bring forth remarkable creations like cathode. As time passed by, Ernest Turner Electrical Instruments factory continued to thrive on its commitment to quality craftsmanship. Each day brought new challenges but also fresh opportunities to push boundaries further and redefine what was possible with cathode technology. From humble beginnings to becoming an integral part of scientific progress, it has left an indelible mark on history. Its legacy lives on through countless applications across diverse fields – from electronics to chemistry – shaping our modern world. So next time you encounter a calculating machine or witness electrolysis at work or marvel at electronic valves' functionality, remember that behind all these wonders lies the brilliance - an invention that changed everything we thought was possible.