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Humour Gallery

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 4032 pictures in our Humour collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Featured Humour Print

An Ideal Home No. II. The Folding Garden

This folding garden for flat dwellers with a love of open-air life will appeal to all householders who enjoy rustic amenities in a urban setting. The second of the Ideal Home designs by W. Heath Robinson. The illustrations from The Sketch depict ingenious space creating ideas for the spatially challenged home. Please note: Credit must appear as Courtesy of the estate of Mrs J.C.Robinson/Pollinger Ltd/ILN/Mary Evans

© Mary Evans Picture Library 2015 - https://copyrighthub.org/s0/hub1/creation/maryevans/MaryEvansPictureID/10223838

Featured Humour Print

Observed of all observers by Alfred Leete

The Chauffeur of a coal-gas-driven car (to a gathering crowd): Wot are you 'anging' around 'cre for? The Crowd: Please, Mister, we'se waiting for the balloon to go up. A humorous comment on the use of coal gas powered vehicles during the First World War, introduced as petrol became increasingly scarce. The 'gas bag' cars carried their fuel in an enormous rubber bag on the roof and were the subject of many jokes and cartoons such as this one by Alfred Leete, an artist best known for his famous Kitchener 'Your King and Country Needs You' cover for London Opinion magazine. Date: 1917

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans

Featured Humour Print

(The Morning After of a Faun) 'Le Lendemain d'un Faune' (or

(The Morning After of a Faun) 'Le Lendemain d'un Faune' (or, 'What an Afternoon') - The Great success of the new ballet 'L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune' in which the faun, failing to abduct the nymph herself, has to be content with her wrap, has suggested a sequel - wherein M. Nijinsky is made to account for his theft in the usual way. The Policeman is calling on a bad line (to his Chief) who can't quite understand whether he is saying 'Faune' or 'Phone' !!! Date: 1913

© Illustrated London News Ltd/Mary Evans