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Home > All Images > 2005 > January > 24 Jan 2005

Images Dated 24th January 2005

Available as Framed Prints, Photos, Wall Art and Gift Items

Choose from 105 pictures in our Images Dated 24th January 2005 collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. Popular choices include Framed Prints, Canvas Prints, Posters and Jigsaw Puzzles. All professionally made for quick delivery.


Surrounded by buildings, the moonlight forms a ring over Macedonias capital Skopje Featured 24 Jan 2005 Print

Surrounded by buildings, the moonlight forms a ring over Macedonias capital Skopje

Surrounded by buildings, the moonlight forms a ring over Macedonia's capital Skopje, early morning on, 24 January, 2005.This sight occurs when high thin clouds containing millions of tiny ice crystals cover much of the sky. Each ice crystal acts like a miniature lens. Because most of the crystals have a similar elongated hexagonal shape, light entering one crystal face and exiting through the opposing face refracts 22 degrees, which corresponds to the radius of the Moon's Halo. NO RIGHTS CLEARANCES OR PERMISSIONS ARE REQUIRED FOR THIS IMAGE. REUTERS/Ognen Teofilovski OT/THI - RP5DRIGQPYAA

Sperm whale and giant squid Featured 24 Jan 2005 Print

Sperm whale and giant squid

Sperm whale and giant squid. Computer artwork of a sperm whale (Physeter catodon, or macrocephalus, left) hunting a giant squid (Architeuthis sp., at right). Sperm whales can reach 18 metres in length and giant squid can be up to 10 metres long. Sperm whales are toothed whales (teeth seen in lower jaw), though the teeth are thought to be used in aggression between males, rather than eating. Sperm whales dive deep (over 1000 metres) to hunt their main prey, giant squid. The squid can defend itself with suckers and sharp beak, and scars are found on whales from these defences. However, the giant squid is rarely seen, most often found in a sperm whale's intestines or washed up on a beach

© CHRISTIAN DARKIN/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY

Static electricity Featured 24 Jan 2005 Print

Static electricity

Static electricity. Strips of paper that have been electrically charged by a Van de Graaff generator, a device that generates static electricity. Charge accumulates on the metal dome and is transferred to the paper. When uncharged, the strips of paper hang downwards under gravity, but when they are electrically charged they repel each other and move upwards and apart (as is seen here). This is possible because the electrical force is stronger than gravity. The two opposing types of electrical charge (positive and negative) usually cancel out, but excess charge (as here), clearly demonstrates the greater strength of the electrical force

© ANDREW LAMBERT PHOTOGRAPHY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY