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Astrophysics Collection

Astrophysics, the captivating realm where science and wonder intertwine, unveils the secrets of our vast universe

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Pale Blue Dot, Voyager 1

Pale Blue Dot, Voyager 1
This unique narrow-angle color image is of the Earth, dubbed Pale Blue Dot, is a part of the first ever portrait of the solar system taken by Voyager 1

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2012

Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2012. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) infrared image of distant galaxies in a region of the sky in the constellation of Fornax

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: MAP microwave background

MAP microwave background
Cosmic microwave background. Whole sky image of the cosmic microwave background made by the MAP (Microwave Anisotropy Probe) spacecraft

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: 1919 solar eclipse

1919 solar eclipse. Image 2 of 3. This set of images, taken by the British astronomer Arthur Eddington (1882-1944), confirmed Einsteins theory of general relativity

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Orion nebula

Orion nebula. Coloured composite infrared and visible light image of the Orion nebula M42. This emission nebula, a cloud of gas and dust in which starbirth takes place

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Hubble Ultra Deep Field galaxies

Hubble Ultra Deep Field galaxies
Ultra Deep Field galaxies. Hubble Space Telescope Ultra Deep Field, the deepest view ever taken of the universe in 2004. Each dot of light is a separate galaxy

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Orions belt

Orions belt. Optical image of the line of three bright stars making up the belt in the constellation of Orion. The stars are, from lower left to upper right: Alnitak (Zeta Orionis)

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Pillars of Creation

Pillars of Creation, combined Chandra X-ray Observatory and Hubble Space Telescope image. These towering columns are formed of interstellar hydrogen gas and dust

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Gas pillars in the Eagle Nebula

Gas pillars in the Eagle Nebula. Hubble Space Telescope image showing dark pillars of dense molecular hydrogen and dust in the Eagle Nebula (M16)

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: 1919 solar eclipse

1919 solar eclipse
^B1919 solar eclipse. Image 1 of 3.^b This set of images, taken by the British astronomer Arthur Eddington (1882-1944), confirmed Einsteins theory of general relativity

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: A galactic light show in spiral galaxy NGC 4258

A galactic light show in spiral galaxy NGC 4258, also known as M106, about 23 million light years away. This galaxy is famous, however

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Nebula Sh 2-106, HST image

Nebula Sh 2-106, HST image
Nebula Sh 2-106, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. Combined optical and infrared image of the compact star-forming region and emission nebula Sharpless 2-106 (Sh 2-106)

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Cosmic microwave background

Cosmic microwave background. Spherical projection of the cosmic microwave background, using all-sky data from the WMAP (Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe)

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Moon rising over Earths horizon

Moon rising over Earths horizon, composite image. The blue haze of Earths atmosphere can be seen above the horizon. Earth is thought to be the only planet in the solar system that can support life

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Orion nebula (M42)

Orion nebula (M42), optical image. This is a huge starbirth region, where gas is coalescing to form new stars. Radiation from the hot young stars ionises the gases in the nebula

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Sombrero galaxy (M104), HST image

Sombrero galaxy (M104), HST image
Sombrero galaxy (M104, NGC 4594), Hubble Space Telescope image. This spiral galaxy is seen almost edge-on to Earth. Its disc is seen as a dark band of dust crossing the brighter central bulge

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Solar System, artwork

Solar System, artwork
Solar System. Artwork of Earths solar system, showing the planets and other objects that orbit the Sun (upper right). The separations of the orbits are not shown to scale

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Milky Way

Milky Way, optical image. The Milky Way is our own galaxy. Because Earth lies in one of its spiral arms, we look into the central mass of stars and see the galaxy as a band of light crossing the sky

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Antennae colliding galaxies, Hubble image

Antennae colliding galaxies, Hubble image
Antennae colliding galaxies, Hubble Space Telescope image. The Antennae (NGC 4038 and NGC 4039) are formed of two galaxies colliding due to mutual gravitational attraction

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Crab nebula (M1)

Crab nebula (M1), Hubble Space Telescope image. This is a supernova remnant, the remains of a star that ended its life in a massine supernova explosion

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Solar system

Solar system. Composite computer artwork of the nine planets of the solar system that orbit the Sun (far right). In order of their distance from the Sun and anticlockwise from top right they are

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Crab nebula, composite image

Crab nebula, composite image
Crab nebula. Composite x-ray, infrared and optical image of the Crab nebula (M1), a remnant of a supernova that exploded in AD 1054

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Eagle Nebula

Eagle Nebula. Optical image of the Eagle Nebula (M16, NGC 6611). This is an emission nebula, a cloud of gas that glows as the hydrogen gas it contains is ionised by radiation from the hot young stars

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Spiral galaxy M81, composite image

Spiral galaxy M81, composite image in visible (yellow), infrared (red), and ultraviolet (blue) light. The yellow centre indicates older stars, the blue areas in the spiral arms are hot, young stars

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Diagram showing the spectral class and luminosity of stars

Diagram showing the spectral class and luminosity of stars. The diagram was named The Hertzsprung-Russell Diagram, or the H-R diagram for short

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: 1919 solar eclipse

1919 solar eclipse
^B1919 solar eclipse. Image 3 of 3.^b This set of images, taken by the British astronomer Arthur Eddington (1882-1944), confirmed Einsteins theory of general relativity

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: The Orion Nebula

The Orion Nebula (also known as Messier 42, M42, or NGC 1976) is a diffuse nebula situated south of Orions Belt. It is one of the brightest nebulae, visible to the naked eye in the night sky

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Horsehead Nebula

Horsehead Nebula. Optical image of Barnard 33 (the Horsehead Nebula), 1600 light years away in the constellation of Orion. North is at left

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Supernova in galaxy

Supernova in galaxy
Supernova SN1994D. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of supernova SN1994D (lower left) in the galaxy NGC 4526. A supernova is the explosive death of a star

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Supernova explosion, artwork

Supernova explosion, artwork
Supernova explosion, computer artwork. Supernovas are the explosive deaths of massive stars

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Hale-Bopp comet

Hale-Bopp comet
Hale-Bopp. Artwork of the comet Hale-Bopp above an ocean shore. Hale-Bopp was one of the brightest comets of the 20th century, and was seen for much of early 1997. A comet is a lump of ice and rock

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Aurora over Antarctica, satellite image

Aurora over Antarctica, satellite image
Aurora over Antarctica, ultraviolet satellite image. Australia is at upper left. This is the aurora australis (green ring), the southern lights display

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Saturn, Cassini image

Saturn, Cassini image
Saturn. Cassini spacecraft image of Saturn, its rings, and two of its moons Titan (upper right) and Tethys (bottom left). The rings, which consist of particles of nearly pure water ice

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Spiral galaxy NGC 2841, HST image

Spiral galaxy NGC 2841, HST image
Spiral galaxy NGC 2841, Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image. This galaxy lies around 46 million light years from Earth in the constellation Ursa Major

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Light echoes from exploding star

Light echoes from exploding star
Light echoes from an exploding star. Hubble Space Telescope image of an illuminated dust shell around the star v838 Monocerotis

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Planetary nebula

Planetary nebula NGC 6751. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of the planetary nebula NGC 6751. A planetary nebula is formed when a Sun-like star ejects its outer layers at the end of its life

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Interacting galaxies Arp 147, HST image

Interacting galaxies Arp 147, HST image
Interacting galaxies Arp 147. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of a pair of interacting galaxies known as Arp 147. The galaxy at left is relatively undisturbed apart from a smooth ring of

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Io and Jupiter, Cassini image

Io and Jupiter, Cassini image. Io, the round object at left, is one of the largest of the moons of Jupiter. Clouds in Jupiters atmosphere form the backdrop to this image

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Observing the Universe, conceptual image

Observing the Universe, conceptual image
Observing the Universe, conceptual computer illustration

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Ring Nebula M57, Hubble image C017 / 3725

Ring Nebula M57, Hubble image C017 / 3725
Ring Nebula (M22, NGC 6720). Combined images from the Subaru Telescope and Hubble Space telescope of the Ring Nebula M57. The Ring nebula is a planetary nebula lying around 2300 light years

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Edwin Hubble, US astronomer C008 / 8831

Edwin Hubble, US astronomer C008 / 8831
Edwin Hubble. Caricature of the US astronomer, cosmologist, athlete and boxer Edwin Powell Hubble (1889-1953) smoking a pipe

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Interacting galaxies

Interacting galaxies. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of the interacting spiral galaxies NGC 2207 (left) and IC 2163 (right)

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Interacting galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258

Interacting galaxies NGC 5257 and 5258
Interacting galaxies NGC 5257 and NGC 5258. Hubble Space Telescope (HST) image of two interacting spiral galaxies, collectively known as Arp 240

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Cigar galaxy (M82), composite image

Cigar galaxy (M82), composite image
Cigar galaxy (M82). Combined optical, infrared and X-ray image of the Cigar galaxy (M82). This image was obtained by combining data from three of NASAs Great Observatories, found in Earth orbit

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Milky Way

Milky Way. Mosaic of photographs of the Milky Way, the spiral galaxy in which our solar system lies. Our Sun is believed to be around two-thirds of the way out from the centre in a small spiral arm

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Dark matter distribution

Dark matter distribution. Image 3 of 4. Supercomputer simulation, known as the Millennium Run, showing the distribution of dark matter in the local universe

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Helix nebula, infrared Spitzer image

Helix nebula, infrared Spitzer image
Helix nebula (NGC 7293), infrared Spitzer Space Telescope image. This is a planetary nebula, a series of shells of gas cast off by a dying star

Background imageAstrophysics Collection: Mars, composite satellite images

Mars, composite satellite images
Mars. Composite satellite images of the surface of Mars from multiple aspects. North is at top. Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun, and is a rocky desert world



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Astrophysics, the captivating realm where science and wonder intertwine, unveils the secrets of our vast universe. From the iconic "Pale Blue Dot" image captured by Voyager 1 to the mesmerizing Hubble Ultra Deep Field 2012 photograph, astrophysics continues to expand our cosmic understanding. In 1919, during a solar eclipse, Sir Arthur Eddington's groundbreaking experiment confirmed Einstein's theory of general relativity. This pivotal moment paved the way for further astronomical breakthroughs. Gazing at Orion's Belt in awe, we are reminded of its celestial beauty and significance within our night sky. The Hubble Ultra Deep Field galaxies capture our imagination as they reveal countless distant galaxies scattered across space-time. The MAP microwave background survey provided us with an unprecedented glimpse into the early universe, uncovering ancient patterns imprinted on cosmic radiation. Meanwhile, the ethereal glow of the Orion Nebula showcases stellar birth in all its splendor. Amongst these wonders lies one of nature's most breathtaking creations: The Pillars of Creation. These colossal gas and dust structures within M16 remind us that even amidst chaos, beauty emerges. Delving deeper into nebulae like Sh 2-106 through stunning images from NASA's Hubble Space Telescope leaves us awestruck by their intricate formations and vibrant colors. Witnessing gas pillars in the Eagle Nebula evokes a sense of both fragility and resilience found throughout space. Revisiting history once more brings us back to that transformative moment during a solar eclipse in 1919 when scientific theories were validated against nature itself. It was then that humanity took another step towards unraveling universal mysteries. Lastly, we encounter the Cosmic Microwave Background (CMB), an echo from nearly fourteen billion years ago when light first permeated our expanding cosmos after the Big Bang. This faint radiation holds vital clues about our origins and paints a vivid picture of how everything began.