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Earth Gallery

Choose from 1,287 pictures in our Earth collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Pioneer F Plaque Symbology Featured Earth Print

Pioneer F Plaque Symbology

The Pioneer F spacecraft, destined to be the first man made object to escape from the solar system into interstellar space, carries this pictorial plaque. It is designed to show scientifically educated inhabitants of some other star system, who might intercept it millions of years from now, when Pioneer was launched, from where, and by what kind of beings. (With the hope that they would not invade Earth.) The design is etched into a 6 inch by 9 inch gold-anodized aluminum plate, attached to the spacecraft's attenna support struts in a position to help shield it from erosion by interstellar dust. The radiating lines at left represents the positions of 14 pulsars, a cosmic source of radio energy, arranged to indicate our sun as the home star of our civilization. The "1-" symbols at the ends of the lines are binary numbers that represent the frequencies of these pulsars at the time of launch of Pioneer F relative of that to the hydrogen atom shown at the upper left with a "1" unity symbol. The hydrogen atom is thus used as a "universal clock, " and the regular decrease in the frequencies of the pulsars will enable another civilization to determine the time that has elapsed since Pioneer F was launched. The hydrogen is also used as a "universal yardstick" for sizing the human figures and outline of the spacecraft shown on the right. The hydrogen wavelength, about 8 inches, multiplied by the binary number representing "8" shown next to the woman gives her height, 64 inches. The figures represent the type of creature that created Pioneer. The man's hand is raised in a gesture of good will. Across the bottom are the planets, ranging outward from the Sun, with the spacecraft trajectory arching away from Earth, passing Mars, and swinging by Jupiter

© NASA

Blue Marble image of Earth (2005) Featured Earth Print

Blue Marble image of Earth (2005)

Blue Marble image of Earth. Composite satellite image of Earth's western hemisphere, centred on the Atlantic Ocean. North is at top. The image is one of a set entitled Blue Marble: Next Generation, released in October 2005, which improves upon Blue Marble 2000. The new images combine data collected over a longer period of time at an improved resolution of 500 metres per pixel. Features include cloud cover, oceans, phytoplankton activity, topography, and city lights in the nighttime part of the hemisphere. Data was obtained mainly by NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites between July 2001 and July 2004. Topography is based on radar data collected by the Space Shuttle Endeavor

© Nasa Earth Observatory/Science Photo Library

US exploration of Mars, artwork Featured Earth Print

US exploration of Mars, artwork

US exploration of Mars, artwork. Astronaut preparing to plant the flag of the United States of America (USA) on the Martian surface. Mars is a rocky desert world with no surface water and a gravity about one third of that on Earth. The atmosphere is mostly carbon dioxide and surface temperatures are well below freezing. The thin atmosphere means that flags need to be rigid rather than made of cloth. Human missions to explore Mars have been planned since the 1950s, usually involving a period of 10 to 30 years to develop the necessary technology and resources. The most recent US plan, NASA's Constellation Program, had a Martian mission as its ultimate aim, but as of 2010 has an uncertain future

© DETLEV VAN RAVENSWAAY/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY