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Solar System Gallery

Choose from 860 pictures in our Solar System collection for your Wall Art or Photo Gift. All professionally made for Quick Shipping.


Blue Marble image of Earth (2005) Featured Solar System Print

Blue Marble image of Earth (2005)

Blue Marble image of Earth. Composite satellite image of Earth's western hemisphere, centred on the Atlantic Ocean. North is at top. The image is one of a set entitled Blue Marble: Next Generation, released in October 2005, which improves upon Blue Marble 2000. The new images combine data collected over a longer period of time at an improved resolution of 500 metres per pixel. Features include cloud cover, oceans, phytoplankton activity, topography, and city lights in the nighttime part of the hemisphere. Data was obtained mainly by NASA's Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) aboard the Terra and Aqua satellites between July 2001 and July 2004. Topography is based on radar data collected by the Space Shuttle Endeavor

© Nasa Earth Observatory/Science Photo Library

Stunning light shows in a planets atmosphere Featured Solar System Print

Stunning light shows in a planets atmosphere

Astronomers are using the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to study auroras -- stunning light shows in a planet's atmosphere -- on the poles of the largest planet in the solar system, Jupiter. This observation program is supported by measurements made by NASA's Juno spacecraft, currently on its way to Jupiter. Jupiter, the largest planet in the solar system, is best known for its colorful storms, the most famous being the Great Red Spot. Now astronomers have focused on another beautiful feature of the planet, using Hubble's ultraviolet capabilities. The extraordinary vivid glows shown in the new observations are known as auroras. They are created when high-energy particles enter a planet's atmosphere near its magnetic poles and collide with atoms of gas. As well as producing beautiful images, this program aims to determine how various components of Jupiter's auroras respond to different conditions in the solar wind, a stream of charged particles ejected from the sun. This observation program is perfectly timed as NASA's Juno spacecraft is currently in the solar wind near Jupiter and will enter the orbit of the planet in early July 2016. While Hubble is observing and measuring the auroras on Jupiter, Juno is measuring the properties of the solar wind itself; a perfect collaboration between a telescope and a space probe. "These auroras are very dramatic and among the most active I have ever seen", said Jonathan Nichols from the University of Leicester, U.K., and principal investigator of the study. "It almost seems as if Jupiter is throwing a firework party for the imminent arrival of Juno." Credits: NASA, ESA, and J. Nichols (University of Leicester)

© NASA

Space debris, artwork Featured Solar System Print

Space debris, artwork

Space debris. Computer artwork showing the distribution of localised space junk (debris) around the Earth, according to the European Space Agency (ESA). Such debris ranges from the remains of failed launches to defunct satellites and even unsecured tools that drifted away from an orbiting spacecraft. About 46% of the residues are in Low Earth Orbit (LEO), 6% in Medium Earth Orbit (MEO), 5% in Molniya Orbit and 43% in Geostationary Orbit (GEO). The amount of debris could be enough to make LEO and GEO orbits unusable in a few decades

© CARLOS CLARIVAN/SCIENCE PHOTO LIBRARY