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Macromolecule Collection

Macromolecules, the building blocks of life, are at the forefront of scientific innovation

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Nanotube technology

Nanotube technology. Computer artwork of four cylindrical fullerenes (carbon nanotubes) of varying size, with the smaller ones nested inside the larger ones

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Zinc fingers bound to a DNA strand

Zinc fingers bound to a DNA strand, molecular model. The double helix of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, red and yellow) is seen here with two Zif268 proteins (blue and green)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Carbon nanotube

Carbon nanotube. Computer artwork showing the hexagonal carbon structure of a nanotube, or buckytube

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: SARS coronavirus protein

SARS coronavirus protein. Molecular model of the ORF-9b protein produced by the SARS (severe acute respiratory syndrome) coronavirus

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Nanotube technology, computer artwork

Nanotube technology, computer artwork
Nanotube technology. Computer artwork of a cylindrical fullerene molecule (carbon nanotube). The hexagonal carbon structure of the nanotube is shown here

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Fullerene molecule, computer artwork

Fullerene molecule, computer artwork
Fullerene molecule. Computer artwork of the spherical fullerene molecule C320. Fullerenes are a structural type (allotrope) of carbon

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Buckyball molecule

Buckyball molecule. Computer artwork of a molecule of buckminsterfullerene (C60), a spherical fullerene and the first fullerene to be discovered (in 1985)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: TFAM transcription factor bound to DNA C015 / 7059

TFAM transcription factor bound to DNA C015 / 7059
TFAM transcription factor bound to DNA, molecular model. Human mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM, green) bound to a strand of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, blue and pink)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Adenovirus hexon protein

Adenovirus hexon protein, molecular model. Hexon proteins are part of the protein coat or shell (capsid) of adenoviruses. In viruses

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: High-contrast direct DNA image, TEM

High-contrast direct DNA image, TEM
High-contrast direct DNA image. Coloured transmission electron micrograph (TEM) of the first high-contrast direct image of a bundle (fibre) of strands of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: MscL ion channel protein structure

MscL ion channel protein structure. Molecular model showing the protein structure of a Mechanosensitive Channel of Large Conductance (MscL) from a Mycobacterium tuberculosis bacterium

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Cucumber mosaic virus, computer model

Cucumber mosaic virus, computer model
Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), computer model. This image was created using molecular modelling software and data from X-ray crystallography

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Murine norovirus with antibody fragments

Murine norovirus with antibody fragments
Murine norovirus (MNV) with antibody fragments, computer model. This image was created using molecular modelling software and data from cryo- electron microscopy

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Illustration of macromolecule of sodium chloride (salt)

Illustration of macromolecule of sodium chloride (salt)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Conceptual image of polyomavirus

Conceptual image of polyomavirus

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Conceptual image of a ubiquitous virus

Conceptual image of a ubiquitous virus. A ubiquitous virus is contagious in early childhood through the respiratory tract

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Ricin A-chain, artwork C017 / 3653

Ricin A-chain, artwork C017 / 3653
Ricin A-chain. Computer artwork showing the enzymatically active A-chain from a molecule of the toxic protein ricin. Ricin comprises two entwined amino acid chains; A (seen here) and B (not shown)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7082

TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7082
TATA box-binding protein complex. Molecular model showing a TATA box-binding protein (TBP, green) complexed with a strand of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, yellow) and transcription factor IIB

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7088

TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7088
TATA box-binding protein complex. Molecular model showing a TATA box-binding protein (TBP, green) complexed with a strand of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, yellow) and transcription factor IIB

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Ricin molecule, artwork C017 / 3652

Ricin molecule, artwork C017 / 3652
Ricin molecule. Computer artwork showing the structure of a molecule of the toxic protein ricin. Ricin comprises two entwined amino acid chains; A (yellow) and B (blue)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7084

TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7084
TATA box-binding protein complex. Molecular model showing a TATA box-binding protein (TBP, green) complexed with a strand of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, yellow) and transcription factor IIB

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Ricin molecule, artwork C017 / 3651

Ricin molecule, artwork C017 / 3651
Ricin molecule. Computer artwork showing the structure of a molecule of the toxic protein ricin. Ricin comprises two entwined amino acid chains; A (yellow) and B (blue)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Ricin molecule, artwork C017 / 3650

Ricin molecule, artwork C017 / 3650
Ricin molecule. Computer artwork showing the structure of a molecule of the toxic protein ricin. Ricin comprises two entwined amino acid chains; A (yellow) and B (blue)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: HK97 bacteriophage capsid

HK97 bacteriophage capsid, molecular model. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria, in this case enterobacteria such as E. coli (Escherichia coli), with the phage head shown here

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Chikungunya virus capsid

Chikungunya virus capsid, molecular model. This virus, transmitted by mosquitoes in tropical Africa and Asia, causes fever and joint pain in humans, similar to dengue fever

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: HK97 bacteriophage procapsid

HK97 bacteriophage procapsid. Molecular model showing the structure of the prohead-I procapsid of the HK97 bacteriophage. Bacteriophages are viruses that infect bacteria

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Turnip yellow mosaic virus capsid

Turnip yellow mosaic virus capsid, molecular model. This virus infects a wide variety of plants, including crops such as turnips and cabbages, causing yellow patches on the leaves

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Sindbis virus capsid, molecular model

Sindbis virus capsid, molecular model. This virus, transmitted by mosquitoes, causes sindbis fever in humans. In viruses, the capsid is the protein shell that encloses the genetic material

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Murine polyomavirus capsid

Murine polyomavirus capsid, molecular model. This virus, one of a range named for their potential to cause multiple tumours, infects mice

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Brome mosaic virus capsid

Brome mosaic virus capsid, molecular model. This plant virus infects grasses, especially brome grasses, and also barley. It causes mosaic patches of discolouration

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid

Cowpea chlorotic mottle virus capsid, molecular model. This virus (CCMV) infects the cowpea plant (Vigna unguiculata), causing yellow spots of discolouration

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Potassium ion channel protein structure

Potassium ion channel protein structure. Molecular model of a KcsA potassium ion (K+) channel from Streptomyces lividans bacteria

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Streptavidin-biotin molecular complex

Streptavidin-biotin molecular complex. Molecular model of a single-strand binding complex of streptavidin (ribbons) and biotin (space-filled model, centre). Biotin is also known as vitamin B7

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Potassium ion channel beta subunit

Potassium ion channel beta subunit. Molecular model showing the structure a beta subunit of a voltage-dependent potassium (K+) channel

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: KCNQ ion channel protein structure

KCNQ ion channel protein structure. Molecular model showing the protein structure of an ion channel domain. Ion channels are membrane-spanning proteins that form a pathway for the movement of

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Potassium ion channel cavity structure

Potassium ion channel cavity structure. Molecular model showing the structure of a cavity formed by potassium ion channel proteins

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Avian polyomavirus capsid

Avian polyomavirus capsid, molecular model. This virus, one of a range named for their potential to cause multiple tumours, infects birds. Discovered in budgerigars in 1981, it is often fatal

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus capsid

Cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus capsid, molecular model. Part of the Cypovirus genus and invariably fatal, this insect virus is transmitted by contamination of leaves eaten (examples include silkworms)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7090

TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7090
TATA box-binding protein complex. Molecular model showing a TATA box-binding protein (TBP, green) complexed with a strand of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, spheres) and transcription factor IIB

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Theilers encephalomyelitis virus capsid

Theilers encephalomyelitis virus capsid, molecular model. This virus, which causes brain and spinal cord inflammation in mice, is used in research

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7085

TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7085
TATA box-binding protein complex. Molecular model showing a TATA box-binding protein (TBP, green) complexed with a strand of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, yellow) and transcription factor IIB

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Ricin A-chain, artwork C017 / 3654

Ricin A-chain, artwork C017 / 3654
Ricin A-chain. Computer artwork showing the enzymatically active A-chain from a molecule of the toxic protein ricin. Ricin comprises two entwined amino acid chains; A (seen here) and B (not shown)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Tobacco necrosis virus capsid

Tobacco necrosis virus capsid, molecular model. This plant virus infects a wide rage of plants, including the tobacco plant for which it is named. The virus causes tissue death (necrosis)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Ricin molecule, artwork C017 / 3649

Ricin molecule, artwork C017 / 3649
Ricin molecule. Computer artwork showing the structure of a molecule of the toxic protein ricin. Ricin comprises two entwined amino acid chains; A (yellow) and B (blue)

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7083

TATA box-binding protein complex C017 / 7083
TATA box-binding protein complex. Molecular model showing a TATA box-binding protein (TBP, green) complexed with a strand of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid, yellow) and transcription factor IIB

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Grapevine fanleaf virus capsid

Grapevine fanleaf virus capsid, molecular model. This plant virus is named for its infection of grape vines. It is transmitted by the nematode worm Xiphinema index

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: VEE equine encephalitis virus capsid

VEE equine encephalitis virus capsid
Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus capsid, molecular model. This mosquito-borne virus can kill horses and other equine species, causing brain and spinal cord inflammation

Background imageMacromolecule Collection: Adenosine molecule

Adenosine molecule
Adenosine monophosphate (AMP), molecular model. Nucleotide used as a monomer in RNA. Atoms are represented as spheres and are colour-coded: carbon (grey), hydrogen (green-blue), nitrogen (blue)



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Macromolecules, the building blocks of life, are at the forefront of scientific innovation. Nanotube technology has revolutionized various fields, enabling advancements in medicine and electronics. In this captivating computer artwork, we witness the intricate Zinc fingers binding to a DNA strand, showcasing their crucial role in gene regulation. Carbon nanotubes have also emerged as remarkable materials with immense potential. Their unique structure and properties make them ideal for applications ranging from energy storage to drug delivery systems. Computer-generated images depict these carbon nanotubes in all their glory. The SARS coronavirus protein is another macromolecule that has garnered significant attention due to its role in viral infection. Scientists tirelessly study it to develop effective treatments against deadly outbreaks. Computer models allow us to explore complex structures like Bacteriophage phi29—a virus that infects bacteria—providing insights into its mechanisms and aiding in the development of targeted therapies. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), closely related to HIV, poses a global health challenge. Understanding its macromolecular components helps researchers devise strategies for prevention and treatment. Rhodopsin protein molecule captures our imagination with its vital function in vision. Its elegant structure enables light detection and initiates visual signals within our eyes. TFAM transcription factor bound to DNA C015/7059 showcases how macromolecules regulate gene expression by interacting with specific regions on DNA strands—an essential process for cell functioning and development. These glimpses into the world of macromolecules highlight their significance across diverse disciplines—from cutting-edge technologies like nanotube engineering to unraveling infectious diseases or understanding fundamental biological processes. As scientists continue exploring these fascinating molecules, they pave the way for groundbreaking discoveries that shape our future.